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THE UNIVERSITY 



OF 



NORTH CAROLINA 




CATALOGUE 



1898-99 



CHAPEL HILL 
PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVEESITY 

1899 



THE UNIVERSITY PRESS 

CHAPEL HILL 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Calendar _ _ 6 

The University 7-19 

Foundation and Government 7, 8 

Location 9 

Equipment- — _ 9, 10 

College Year .... . 10 

Degrees _ 10 

Students not Candidates for a Degree _ 10 

Graduate Students 10 

Physical Culture _... 10, 11 

General Culture _ 11 

Religious Culture _ 1 1 

Discipline.. - _ _ 1 1 

Medical Attention _ 11 

Trustees ..:. 12-14 

Officers and Members of the Board 12-14 

Standing Committees of the Trustees 14 

Faculty and Other Officers.— .„.. 15-19 

Professors, Instructors and Officers 15-18 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 18,19 

Preachers to the University 19 

Departments of the Unr^ersity _ __ 20 

The College.- _„ 21-68 

Faculty _ „ _.. 21, 22 

Courses of Instruction _ 23-45 

Schedule of Hours for Lectures _ 46, 47 

Courses Leading to Degrees _ 48-50 

Grades of Scholarship _ 51 

Degrees _ 51, 52 

Certificates 52 



Y 



* CONTENTS 

Courses for students not Candidates for a Degree 52, 53 

Graduate Students.- 54-56 

Admission _ 54 

Degrees 54-56 

Admission of Women 56 

Pecuniary Aid and Expenses .„.. 57-62 

Medals and Prizes _ _ 57, 58 

Scholarships _ 58, 59 

Free Tuition __ 60 

Loan Funds 60 

Expenses 60, 61 

Dormitory Accommodations- 61, 62 

Assignment of Rooms _. 62 

Requirements for Admission _ 63-67 

Admission into the Freshman Class _ 63-65 

Admission to Advanced Standing 63-66 

Examinations for the Removal of Conditions 6(1-67 

Admission of Optional Students 67 

Registration 68 

The Law School 69, 73 

Faculty- - '69 

Courses of Instruction — 69. 70 

The Degree of LL.B._ — : 71 

Moot Court _.. — - _ 71 

Expenses - : 72 

Admission and Registration „_ _ 72 

Summer School _ _ 73 

The Medical School 74-79 

Faculty -— « — - - 74 

Courses of Instruction 74-78 

Pecuniary Aid - 78 

Expenses 78 

Admission and Registration . — 79 

The School op Pharmacy 80-82 

Faculty - 80 

Courses of Instruction _ 80-82 

Laboratories — 82 



CONTENTS 5 

Admission and Registration _ — 82 

Students _ 83-100 

The College 83-94 

The Law School 94-96 

The Medical School __ 96-98 

The School of Pharmacy _. 98 

Summary .- 99, 100 

The Summer School. 101-108 

Faculty _ 101, 102 

Courses of Instruction : 102-104 

Certificates — — 1 04 

Expenses — — — 104 

Admission and Registration 104 

Students - _ -104-108 

The University Library 109-111 

Laboratories and Museums 112-115 

The Physical Laboratory 112 

The Chemical Laboratory 112, 113 

The Biological Laboratory _ _ 114 

The Geological Laboratory „. 114. 115 

The Gymnasium * 116 

The University Organizations 117-120 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies 117 

The Philological Club 118 

The Shakespere Club _ 118 

The North Carolina Historical Society 118,119 

The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society.. ...119, 120 

The Young Men's Christian Association _ 120 

One Hundred and Third Commencement... 121, 123 

Speakers _ _ 121 

Degrees 121,122 

Certificates 123 

Medals and Prizes — 123 

Summary 124 

Index - 125,126 



OALEN'DAE. 



1899. 

September 11-16. Monday to Saturday. Examinations for the 

Removal of Conditions. 
September 13, 14, 15. Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. Examinations 

for Admission into the College. 
September 14, 15. 16. Thursday, Friday, Saturday. Registration. 
September 16. Saturday. Assignment of Rooms. 

September IS. Monday. Lectures begin. 

October IS. Thursday. University Day. 

October 12. Thursday. President's Reception. 

November SO. Thursday. Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas. Recess from December 23, 1899, to January 2, 1900, 
inclusive. 



1900. 

January 3, 4, 5. 
January 3. 
January 4- 
February 22. 
June 3. 
June 5. 
June 5. 
June 5. 



June 5. 
June 6. 
Summer Vacat 



Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. Registration. 
Wednesday. Assignment of Rooms. 
Thursday. Lectures begin. 
Thursday. Washington's Birthday. 
Sunday. Baccalaureate Sermon. 
Tuesday. Meeting of the Board of Trustees. 
Tuesday. Anniversary of the Alumni. 
Tuesday. Orations by Representatives from 

the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary 

Societies. 
Tuesday. Senior Class Day. 
Wednesday. Commencement. 
ION from Commencement to the Second Thursday 

in September. 



THE UNIVERSITY. 



Foundation and Government. The University was estab- 
lished in obedience to the first Constitution of the State, which 
was adopted in December, 1776. A clause of Section XLI. de- 
clared that "all useful learning shall be duly encouraged, and 
promoted in one or more universities." The Charter was granted 
by the General Assembly in 1789, the corner stone of the Old East 
Building was laid in 1793 and the University was opened in 1795. 

The title, preamble, and first section of the Act of incorpora- 
tion are as follows : — 

An Act to establish a University in this State : 

" Whereas in all well regulated Governments, it is the indis- 
pensable Duty of every Legislature to consult the Happiness of 
a rising Generation, and endeavor to fit them for an honourable 
Discharge of the social Duties of Life, by paying the strictest 
Attention to their Education : And whereas an University sup- 
ported by permanent Funds, and well endowed, would have the 
most direct Tendency to answer the above Purpose : 

"I. Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly of the State of 
North-Carolina, and it is hereby enacted by the Authority of the same. 
That Samuel Johnston, James Iredell, Charles Johnson, Hugh, Wil- 
liamson, Stephen Cabarrus, Richard Dobbs Spaight, William Blount, 
Benjamin Williams. John Sitgreaves, Frederick Hargett, Robert 
Snead, Archibald Maclaine, Honourable Samuel Ashe, Robert Dixon. 
Benjamin Smith, Honourable Samuel Spencer, John Hay, James Hogg. 
Henry William Harrington, William Barry Grove, Reverend Samuel 
M'Corkle, Acllai Osborne, John Stokes, John Hamilton, Joseph Gra- 
ham, Honourable John Williams, TJwmas< Person, Alfred Moore, 
Alexander Mebane, Joel Lane, Willie Jones, Benjamin Hawkins, John 
Haywood, senior, John Macon, William Richardson Davie, Joseph 
Dixon, William Lenoir, Joseph M'Dowell, James Holland and Wil- 
liam Porter, Esquires, shall be and they are hereby declared to be 



8 THE UNIVERSITY 

a Body politic and corporate, to be known and distinguished by the 
Name of The Trustees of the University of North Carolina ; * and by 
that Name shall-have perpetual Succession, and a common Seal : 
and that they the Trustees and their Successors, by the Name 
aforesaid, or a Majority of them, shall be able and capable in Law 
to take, demand, receive and possess all Monies, Goods and Chat- 
tels that shall be given them for the Use of the said University, 
and the same apply according to the Will of the Donors, and by 
Gift, Purchase or Devise to take, have, receive, possess, enjoy 
and retain to them and their Successors forever, any Lands, Rents, 
Tenements and Hereditaments, of what Kind. Nature or Quality 
soever the same may be, in special Trust and Confidence that the 
same or the Profits thereof shall be applied to and for the Use and 
Purpose of establishing and endowing the said University." f 

The University is governed by a Board of Trustees elected by 
the Legislature, and is free from sectional, sectarian, or political 
control. The Governor of the State is ex-officio President of the 
Board of Trustees. 

Article IX. of the Constitution of 1876 contains the following 
provisions regarding the University : — 

" Sec. 6. The General Assembly shall have power to provide 
for the election of Trustees of the University of North Carolina, 
in whom, when chosen, shall be vested all the privileges, rights, 
franchises and endowments thereof, in anywise granted to or con- 
ferred upon the Trustees of said University : and the General As- 
sembly may make such provisions, laws and regulations from time 
to time, as may be necessary and expedient for the maintenance 
and management of said University. 

" Sec. 7. The General Assembly shall provide that the benefits 
of the University, as far as practicable, be extended to the youth 
of the State free of expense for tuition : also that all the property 
which has heretofore accrued to the State, or shall hereafter ac- 
crue, from escheats, unclaimed dividends, or distributive shares of 
the estates of deceased persons, shall be appropriated to the use of 
the University."' 

*The corporate name has been changed to The University of North i arolina. 

tLaws of the State of North Carolina, published by James Iredell, Edenton, 
MDCCXCI. 



EQUIPMENT 9 

Location. The seat of the University is Chapel Hill, Orange 
County, twenty-eight miles northwest of Raleigh. Two daily pas- 
senger trains run between Chapel Hill and University Junction, a 
station on the North Carolina Railroad. The site for the institu- 
tion was selected because of its uncommon healthfulness, its free- 
dom from malaria, its supply of» pure water, its beautiful scenery 
and its central position in the State. 

Equipment. The University campus contains forty-eight acres 
of land, affording ample ground for buildings and for all sorts of 
athletic sports. The University owns, contiguous to the campus, 
five hundred acres of forest land, which is partly laid off into walks 
and drives. The University has fourteen buildings. 

The South Building contains the college offices, three lecture 
rooms, the Physical Laboratory and twenty-six dormitories. 

The Old East Building contains two lecture rooms and twenty- 
eight dormitories. 

The Old. West Building contains four lecture rooms, the Histori- 
cal Museum, the University Co-operative Society's store and 
twenty-four dormitories. 

Person Hall contains the Chemical Laboratory and Museum and 
a lectm-e room. 

Gerrard Hall is used for morning prayers, for the meetings of 
the Young Men's Christian Association and for public lectures. 

Smith Hall contains the College Library and the Reading room. 
The basement is fitted up with bathrooms and lavatories. 

The New West Building contains the Dialectic Literary Society's 
Hall, the Pharmaceutical Laboratory, a lecture room and thirteen 
dormitories. 

Hie New East Building contains the Philanthropic Literary So- 
ciety's Hall, the Biological Laboratory and Museum, the Geologi- 
cal and Mineralogical Laboratory and Museum, two lecture rooms 
and fifteen dormitories. 

Memorial Hall commemorates the illustrious dead of the Uni- 
versity. It is used during the session as a gymnasium, and, at 
Commencement, for public exercises. 

The Alumni Hall, for administrative offices and lecture rooms is 
now under construction. 

The Dissecting Hall, fitted up for the use of the Medical School, 
is apart from the other buildings. 



10 THE UNIVERSITY 

The Infirmary contains five rooms, which are properly furnished 
for the care and treatment of the sick. 

Commons is the dining hall of the University. It consists of the 
old Gymnasium, to which has been added a building containing 
kitchen, pantries, and sleeping rooms. The whole enterprise was 
made possible through the beneficence of Mrs. Frederic Baker of 
New York. Board is furnished at eight dollars a month. Stu- 
dents wait upon the tables. 

The Power House contains the University Electric Plant. 

College Year. The College Year begins on the second 
Thursday in September. Commencement is held on the Wednes- 
day before the first Thursday in June. The summer vacation be- 
gins at Commencement, and ends on the Wednesday before the 
second Thursday in September. There is a Christmas recess of 
about ten days. The twelfth of October (University Day), Thanks- 
giving Day, and the twenty-second of February (Washington's 
Birthday) are holidays. 

Degrees. The degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Phil- 
osophy, Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts, Master of Philosophy, 
Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Bachelor of Laws, and 
Graduate in Pharmacy are conferred by the vote of the Trustees, 
after the recommendation of the Faculty, upon candidates who 
have satisfied the requirements of residence and study at the Uni- 
versity. 

Students not Candidates for a Degree. Students who 
are not candidates for a degree may elect any studies they wish, 
devoting their time entirely to one or two subjects, or selecting 
groups of such subjects as suit their tastes and purposes. 

The Faculty have arranged several groups of studies for the 
benefit of students desiring brief preparation for teaching, or for 
the study of law or medicine. 

Graduate Students. Free instruction is offered in the Col- 
lege to graduates of colleges and universities. 

By a vote of the Trustees at their annual meeting in February, 
1897, women are admitted to certain higher courses. 

Physical Culture. Hearty encouragement is given to ath- 
letic sports and to all kinds of physical culture. The athletic field 
furnishes ample facilities for football and baseball. The Lake 



MEDICAL ATTENTION 11 

Track, recently donated by Mr. Henry S. Lake, of the Class of 
1898, is admirably adapted for running, bicycling and general track 
athletics. Fifteen tennis courts are located on the campus. 

Systematic exercise in Memorial Hall under a skilled instructor 
is required of all students in the College, except Seniors. The 
Hall is so spacious and so thoroughly aired and lighted that it fur- 
nishes a place for physical exercise almost as healthful as in the 
open air. The University recognizes the training and intelligent 
care of the body as essential to intellectual power and culture. 

Generate Culture. The University endeavors to furnish such 
general culture outside the lecture rooms and laboratories as will 
broaden the minds and sympathies of young men. 

Religious Culture. Prayers are conducted in Gerrard Hall, 
with the reading of the Scriptures, and singing, every week-day 
morning at 8:30 o'clock. Attendance at this service is required of 
all members of the College, unless specially excused. 

Bible classes for young men are taught in each of the four 
churches of the village every Sunday. Religious exercises are 
held twice a week, or oftener, in each church. 

A series of sermons is delivered annually by the University 
Preachers, chosen by the Trustees from the various denomina- 
tions. During -their periods of residence, also, the religious life of 
the University is directed and strengthened by daily conferences 
with the students. 

Bible lectures are delivered every Sunday morning in Gerrard 
Hall. 

The Young Men's Christian Association meets two times a 
week, in Gerrard Hall, for prayer, and other services. 

The moral tone of the University is high ; its religious life is ac- 
tive, broad and tolerant. 

Discipline. The University endeavors to make young men 
manly and self-reliant, and to develop character by educating the 
conscience. The Faculty may, at their discretion, admonish, sus- 
pend or dismiss students for neglect of duty or for misconduct. 

Medical Attention. On the payment of a small annual fee, 
each student receives the careful attention of the University Phy- 
sician, Dr. Richard Henry Whitehead. In this way the best ined- 
ical advice is to be had at the least cost. 



TRUSTEES. 



DANIEL LINDSAY RUSSELL, Governor, President ex officio 

of the Board of Trustees. 
RICHARD HENRY BATTLE. Secretary and Treasurer. 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 

1899.f 

Name. Countt. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Orange. 

.GEORGE SAMUEL BRADSHAW, Randolph. 

•EABIUS HAYWOOD BUSBEE, Wake. 

MARION BUTLER, Sampson. 

BENNEHAN CAMERON, . Orange. 

JOHN SOMERVILLE CUNINGHAM, Person. 

JOHN WILLIAM FRIES, Forsyth. 

ROBERT MCKNIGHT FURMAN, Buncombe. 

WILLIAM ANDERSON GUTHRIE, Durham. 

THOMAS STEPHEN KENAN, Wake. 

RICHARD HENRY LEWIS, M.D., Wake. 

CHARLES McNAMEE, Buncombe. 

ABRAM HAYWOOD MERRITT, Chatham. 

JAMES DIXON MURPHY, Buncombe. 

JESSE LINDSAY PATTERSON, Forsyth. 

FREDERICK PHILIPS, Edgecombe. 

JOHN WESLEY STARNES, Buncombe. 

HENRY WEIL, Wayne. 
WILLIAM THORNTON WHITSETT, " Guilford. 

JAMES WILLTAM WILSON, Burke, 

1901. 



WILLIAM REYNOLDS ALLEN, Wayne. 

+The legal term of office expires November 30 of the year indicated. 



TRUSTEES 



13 



ALEXANDER BOYD ANDREWS, Wake. 

JACOB BATTLE. Nash. 
RICHARD HENRY BATTLE, LL.D.. Wake. 

JOSEPH PEARSON CALDWELL. Mecklenburg. 

JULIAN SHAKESPEARE CARR. Durham. 

WILLIAM HENRY DAY, Halifax. 

WARREN GRICE ELLIOTT, New Hanover. 

ROBERT DONNELL GILMER, Haywood. 

AUGUSTUS WASHINGTON GRAHAM. Granville. 

ALFRED WILLIAMS HAYAA T OOD, Alamance. 

WILLIAM EDWARD HILL, Duplin. 

EDMUND JONES. Caldwell. 

THOMAS ALEXANDER MeNEILL, Robeson. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS MASON, Northampton. 

PAUL BARRIXGER MEANS. Cabarrus. 

LEE S. OVERMAN, Rowan. 

♦ JAMES PARKER. Gates. 

JOHN ANDREW RAMSAY, Rowan. 

*DAVID GASTON WORTH. New Hanover. 



1903. 



ABNER ALEXANDER. M.D., Tyrrell. 

CHRISTOPHER THOMAS BAILEY. Wake. 

EDMOND SPENCER BLACKBURN, Ashe. 

JAMES EDMUNDS BOYD. Guilford. 
WILLIAM HYSLOP SUMNER BURGWYN, Vance. 

CHARLES ALSTON COOK, Warren. 

* ALBERT BARROW GORRELL, Forsyth. 

JOHN WASHINGTON GRAHAM. Orange. 

JOHN THOMAS HOGAN, Orange. 

JOHN T. B. HOOVER, Wilson. 
JAMES BARLOW LLOYD, ■ Edgecombe. 

THOMAS FRANKLIN LLOYD, Orange. 

JAMES MONTRAVILLE MOODY. Haywood. 

ROBERT BRUCE PEEBLES. Northampton. 

JAMES BION SCHULKEN. Columbus. 

HARRY SKINNER, Pitt. 
*Deceased. 



14 



THE UNIVERSITY 



ZEBULON BAIRD WALSER, 
ELIHU ANTHONY WHITE, 
STEPHEN OTHO WILSON, 
FRANCIS DONNELL WINSTON, 

1905. 

GEORGE. EDWIN BUTLER, 
WILLIAM HOBBS CHADBOURN, 
BEN FRANKLIN DIXON, M.D.. 
CLAUDIUS DOCKERY, 
RUEUS ALEXANDER DOUGHTON, 
HIRAM L. GRANT, 
STEPHEN PORTER GRAVES, 
ROBERT TERELIUS GRAY, 
F. W. HANCOCK, 
THOMAS BERNARD KEOGH. 
VIRGIL STUART LUSK, 
WILLIAM THOMAS MCCARTHY, 
EDWARD HUGHES MEADOWS, 
BENJAMIN SIDNEY MITCHELL, 
NATHAN ALEXANDER RAMSEY, 
WALLACE W. ROLLINS, 
ALFRED MOORE SCALES, 
FRANK SHEPHERD SPRUILL. 
DAVID ALEXANDER WHITE, 



Davidson. 
Perquimans. 
Wake. 
Bertie. 



Sampson. 

New Hanover, 

Cleveland. 

Richmond. 

Alleghany. 

Wayne. 

Surry. 

Wake. 

Granville. 

Guilford. 

Buncombe. 

Craven. 

Craven. 

Franklin. 

Durham. 

Buncombe. 

Guilford. 

Franklin. 

Alamance. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE TRUSTEES. 

Exec utive Committee. 

Governor Daniel Lindsay Russell. Chairman. 
Alexander B. Andrews, John W. Graham. 

Bichard H. Battle, Thomas S. Kenan. 

M a iuon Butler, Richard H. Lewis, 

Julian S. ( 'ark, ■ • Virgil S. Lusk. 

James W. Wilson. 

( 'ommittee of Visitation. 

Charles Alston Cook, Chairman. 

Alfred Williams Haywood, Jesse Lindsay Patterson. 



FACULTY AND OTHER OFFICERS, 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN. D.C.L., 
PRESIDENT, 
Professor of Political and Social Science. 

KEMPPLUMMER BATTLE. EL.D.. 
Alumni Professor of History. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE. PH.D.. 
Smith Professor of General and Analytical ( hemistry. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B.. 
State Geologist, Lecturer on the Geology of North Carolina. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., 
Professor of Physics. 

JOHN MANNING, LL.D., 
Professor of Law. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D., 
Professor of the English Language and Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., 
Professor of Modern Languages, and Secretary of the Faculty. 

EBEN ALEXANDER. Ph.D.. LL.D.. 
Professor of the Greek Language and Literature, and Supervisor of the Library. 

WILLIAM CAIN. C.E., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., 
Professor of Anatomy. 



16 THE UNIVERSITY 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS, A.M., B.D., 
Professor of Philosophy. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., 
Professor of Biology. 

KARL POMEROY HARRINGTON, A.M., 
Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., 
Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., 
Professor of Physiology and Materia Medica. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., 
Professor of Pharmacy. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, 
Professor of Pedagogy. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

HENRY FARRAR LINSCOTT, Ph.D., 
Associate Professor of Classical Philology. 

J AMES CRAWFORD BIGGS, Ph.B., 
Associate Professor of Law. 

SAMUEL MAY, A.B., 
Instructor in Modern Languages. 

WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM SMITH. Ph.B., 
Instructor in English. 

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, A.B., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 



FACULTY AND OTHER OFFICERS 17 



JAMES WILLIAM CALDER, 
Instructor in Physical < 'nlture. 



Instructor in Expression. 

ALBERT FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, Jr., A.B.. 
Assistant in Biology. 

EDWARD JENNER WOOD, 
' Assistant in Biology. 

HENRY M AUGER LONDON. 
Assistant in Geology. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS KENDRICK, 
Assistant in Pharmacy. 

THOMAS CLARKE, Ph.D., 
Assistant in < 'hemistry. 

WILLIAM EDWARD COX, 
Assistant in Physics. 

JESSE KNIGHT DOZIER, 

Assistant in Physics. 

FRANCIS MOORE OSBORNE, 
Assistant in Mathematics. 

EUGENE LEWIS HARRIS, Ph.B., 
Registrar. 

WILLIE THOMAS PATTERSON. 
Bursar. 

RALPH HENRY GRAVES, A.M., 
Librarian. 



18 THE UNIVERSITY 

FRED JACKSON COXE, 

Assistant in the Library. 

JUNIUS DANIEL GRIMES, 
Assistant in the Library. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY. 

The President is a member, ex-ufficio, of all committees. 

On the Curriculum 

Professors Gore, Venable, Wilson, Battle, Alexander, 
Hume and Noble. 

On Auditing 
Professors Venable and Toy. 

On Athletics 
Professor BASKERVILLE. 

On Catalogue and Like Publications 
Professors Linscott, Gore and Alexander. 

On Commons 
Professors WILLIAMS and TOY and Mr. May. 

On the Library 
Professor Alexander. 

On the Publication of the Record 
Professors VENABLE, ALEXANDER and COBB. 

On the Professional Schools 
Professors Manning, Whitehead, Howell and Biggs. 



PREACHERS TO THE UNIVERSITY 19 

On Substitutions unci Petitions 
Professors Gore, Harrington, Cain and Toy. 

On the University Magazine 
Professors Cobb, Hume and Alexander. 

On the Young Metis Christian Association 
Professors Hume and Harrington and Mr. Smith. 

PREACHERS TO THE UNIVERSITY. 

Reverend Peyton Harrison Hoge, D.D., 

Reverend Rodney Rush Swope, D.D., 

Reverend Howard Edward Rondthaler, 

Reverend Samuel Bryant Turrentine, D.D., 

Reverend Junius Millard. 



DEPARTMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY. 



The University embraces the following departments : — 

The College (for Undergraduates and Graduates), 
The Law School, 
. • The Medical School, 
The School of Pharmacy, 
The Summer School. 



THE COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L., President, and Pro- 
fessor of Political and Social Science. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D., Alumni Professor of His- 
tory. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D.. Smith Professor of Gen- 
eral and Analytical Chemistry. • 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B., [State Geologist,) Lecturer on the 
Geology of North Carolina. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D., LL.D., Professor of the English Language 
and Literature. 

WALTER DALLAM TOY, M.A., Professor of Modern Languages. 

EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of the Greek Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

WILLIAM CAIN, C.E., Professor of Mathematics. 

HENRY HORACE WILLIAMS, A.M., B.D., Professor of Philoso- 
phy'. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 

KARLPOMEROY HARRINGTON, A.M., Professor of the Latin 
Language and Literatn re. 

( 'OLLIER COBB, A.M., Professor of Geology. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, Professor of Pedagogy. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chem- 
try. ■ 

HENRY FARRAR LINSCOTT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Clas- 
sical Philology. 



SAMUEL MAY, A.B., Instructor in Modern Languages. 
WILLIAM CUNNINGHAM SMITH, Ph.B., Instructor in English, 



22 THE COLLEGE 

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 
JAMES WILLIAM CALDER, Instructor in Physical Culture. 

, Instructor in Expression . 

ALBERT FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, Jr.. A.B., Assistant in Biol- 
ogy. 
EDWARD JENNER WOOD, Assistant in Biology. 
HENRY M AUGER LONDON,. Assistant in Geology. 
THOMAS CLARKE, PH.D., Assistant in Chemistry. 
WILLIAM EDWARD COX, Assistant in Physics. ' 
JESSE KNIGHT DOZIER, Assistant in Physics. 
FRANCIS MOORE OSBORNE, Assistant in Mathematics 



COUKSES OF INSTRUCTION 



GREEK. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Alexander. 

1. Homer (three books of the Iliad). Review of Greek Grammar. 

Herodotus or Lucian (selections). Reading at sight. 

Four hours a week. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Elective with Latin 1 as a requirement of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Plato (Apology and Crito). Aristophanes (Plutus). Sophocles 

(Electra). Reading at sight. Lectures on Greek Litera- 
ture. Three hours a week. 

Elective with Latin 2 as a requirement of candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

3. Prose Composition (elementary course). Translations from 

English into Greek. One hour a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. Social Life of the Ancient Greeks. Greek Archaeology. 

Text-book and lectures. Three hours a week (fall term). 

5. Modern Greek. Rangabe's Handbook. Bikelas (Stories). 

Newspapers. Two hours a week (spring term). 

(>. Homer (rapid reading of the entire Odyssey). Two hours a 
week. 

7. Euripides (Alcestis) : Sophocles (Oedipus Tyrannus) : Aeschy- 
lus (Agamemnon) ; Aristophanes (Clouds) ; Aristotle 
(Poetics). Three hours a week. 
•2 



24 tftfE COlAMGK 

8. Prose Composition (advanced course). Translations from 

English into Greek. Two hours a week (fall term). 

9. Bacchylides (the Odes). Two hours a xceek (spring term). 

Omitted in 1899-1900. 

10. Demosthenes (Olynthiacs and Philippics). Tiro hours a week 

(spring term). 

Associate Professor Linscott. 

11. New Testament Greek. Exegetical study of St. Mark and 

the Epistle of James. Tioo hours a week. 

Courses 4-11 are elective to students who have completed 
courses 1 and 2. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed 
courses 1, 2 and 3. and four hours of elective work. 



LATIN. 
For Undergraduates. 

Associate Professor LlNSCOTT. 

1. Livy (Books XXI. and XXII. ). Horace (selections from the 

Satires, Epistles, Epodes and Odes). Composition. Read- 
ing at sight. Mythology. Four hours a loeek. 

Required of candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Elective with Greek 1 as a requirement of candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Professor Harrington. 

2. Plautus (Trinummus, Captivi or Menaechmi). Terence (An- 

dria. Phormio or Adelphoe). Lectures on the Roman 

drama. Cicero (selected letters). Tacitus (Agricolaand 

Germania). Special study of some Roman political and 

social institutions. Three hours a week: 

Elective with Greek 2 as a requirement of candidates for 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 



COTJESES OF rNSTEUCTIOX 25 



For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. Pliny (selected letters). Lyric poets : early lyrists, Catullus. 

Horace, the decadence of Latin lyric poetry, Latin 

hymns. Investigation of special subjects. Tiro hours 

a week. 

Given alternately with course 4. 

Elective, in the Junior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

4. The Roman Elegiac Poets (selections from Catullus. Tibullus, 

Propertius and Ovid). Lectures on the origin and growth 

of the ancient elegy. Investigation of special subjects. 

Two hours a treek. 

Given alternately with course 3. To be omitted in 1899-1900. 
Elective, in the Junior year, to candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

o. Roman Philosophy. Lucretius (selections). Cicero (selections 
from the Academica. De Officiis. Tusculan Disputations. 
De Finibus. De Natura Deorum). Seneca (De Provi- 
dentia. De Tranquilitate Animi. De Vita Beata). Lec- 
tures on the history and development of ancient philoso- 
phy. Original research. Tiro hours a week. 

Given alternately with course 6. To be omitted in 1899-19(10. 
Elective in the Senior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

6. Roman Satire. Ennius, Lucilius and Varro (selected frag- 

ments). Horace (Satires I., 10: II., 1, 8 and .">). Persius. 
Juvenal. Seneca (Apocolocyntosis). Petronius and Mar- 
tial (selections). Lectures on the origin and development 
of early satire. Original research. Two hours a week. 

Given alternately with course 5. 

Elective, in the Senior year, to candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Philosophy. 

( 'ourses 5 and 6 properly follow 3 and 4 respectively, but at 
the discretion of the instructor they may be elected to- 
gether with a Junior course, or even, rarely, in advance 
of a Junior course. 

7. General Introduction to Roman Literature. MackaiTs Latin 



26 fHft COJLI.KGti 

Literature, with supplementary lectures. Illustrative 
class-room readings. Two hours, a week. 
A choice of the following' courses of collateral reading : — 

a. B.C. 240-84: Plautus (Rudens), -Terence (Eunuchus), 
Cornifici Rhetorica ad Herennium (Book IV.). 

b. B.C. 83-43: M. Terentius Varro (Res Rusticae, Book 
II.), Cicero (Philippic II.), Lucretius (Book V.). 

c. B. C. 43— A. D. 14: Vergil (Eclogues, Georgics III., 440- 
556, and IV.). Horace (Epistles 11., 1), Livy (Book I.). 

d. A. D. 14-68: Velleius Paterculus (Book II., chapters 
41-131), Seneca (Hercules Purens). Lucan (Pharsalia. 
Book I.). 

e. A. D. 69-117 : Silius Italicus (Punica, Book V.), Statins 
(Silvae, Book I.), Tacitus (Annals, Book IV.). 

/. A. D. 117-211 : Suetonius (life of Augustus), Gellius 
(Noctes Atticae, Books V. and VI.), Apuleius (Metamor- 
phoses IV., 28 -VI., 24). 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

8. Roman Topography. Lectures on the development of the city 

of Rome and the present condition of its ancient ruins, 

preceded by a glance at the geography of the Italian 

peninsula. Illustration by maps, plans, photographs, and 

stereopticon. One hour a week (fall term). 

Given alternately with course 9. To be omitted in 1899-1900. 
Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

9. The Private Life of the Romans. Illustrated lectures on some 

of the more important and interesting customs and insti- 
tutions of Roman everyday life. (Me hour <i week {fall 
term). 

Given alternately with course 8. 

Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

10. Latin Writing. Advanced exercises in the translation of 

English into Latin, with special reference to style. One. 

hour <( week {spring term). 

Given alternately with course 11. To be omitted in 1899- 

1900. 
Elective to students who have completed course 2. 

11. Human Epigraphy. The principles of the science, and the 



C0UBSE8 OF INSTRUCTION 29 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 
French. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Toy and Mr. May. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Written Exercises. French 

Prose. Reading at sight. Three hours a week. 

Elective with Greek 2. Latin 2, or German 1, as a require- 
ment of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts ; 
with German 1. as a requirement of candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Philosophy : and with German 2 or 
History 1, as a requirement of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science. 

Mr. May. 

2. Merimee (Colomba). Dumas (Les Trois Mousquetaires). 

George Sand (La Mare au Diable). Scribe et Legouve 
(Bataille de Dames). Labiche et Martin (Moi). Gram- 
mar. Composition. Reading at sight. Three hours a 
week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor TOY. 

3. French Literature in the Seventeenth Century. Lectures. 

Theses. Reading at sight. Three hours a week. 

For Graduates. 

4. Seminary. Special study of a literary period. 

Courses 3 and 4 are open to candidates for the Master's or 
Doctor's degree. 

A certificate is granted to students who have completed with 

credit courses 1, 2 and 3. 



30 THE COLLEGE 

Spanish. 
For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor Toy. 
1. Elementary Course. Grammar. Written Exercises. Trans- 
lation of Spanish Prose. Reading' at sight. Three hour* a 
week. 
Elective under same conditions as French 1. 

ENGLISH. 

For Undergraduates. 

Mr. Smith. 

1. Rhetoric and Composition. Three hours it week. 

The object of this course is to provide instruction in the the- 
ory and the practice, of English composition. The theory 
is derived from a study of Hill's Principles of Rhetoric, 
Genung's Practical Rhetoric, and Genung's Rhetorical 
Analysis : the practice is obtained by short themes written 
in the class room, and afterwards rewritten or revised in 
accordance with the suggestions of the instructor. For 
an exemplification of what is involved in the making of 
good literature as well as to afford suitable subjects for 
theme work, some masterpieces of English literature — 
taken mainly from the prose writers of the eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries— are read and analyzed. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

2. English Composition. Three hours a week. 

This course is intended for those who have completed the 
work of course 1. Frecpjent practice in composition is given 
in class room exercises and in outside work on assigned top- 
ics. The theme writing is to illustrate the four forms of 
composition, — Description, Narration, Exposition and Ar- 
gument. The object is to cultivate precision and method 
in thought, and clearness, ease, and vigor in expression; 
A rhetorical analysis is made of the style and structure of 
a few prose masterpieces, and due attention is given to the 
analysis and outlining' of the thought. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 31 

In the spring term a brief course is given in the histor- 
ical development of the English language with the use of 
Emerson's History of the English Language, original ex- 
ercises on Bible diction, and Craik's English of Shakspere. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a de- 



Professor Hume. 

3. Essays and Orations. Specimens of Narration and Description. 

English Prose (Minto and Garnettj. Select Orations ana- 
lyzed and discussed. Construction of theses. One hour 

a w&ik. 

Required, in the Senior year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

4. Poetics. First term: The Old Ballads, Spenser, Longer 

English Poems (Hales). Special study of Tennyson : The 
Princess, The Idyls of the King, In Memoriam with other 
elegiac poems, Lycidas, Adonais. ( 'ritical Theses. Sec- 
ond Term : The drama studied in Shakespeare's English 
History Plays, Dowden's Primer of Shakspere, Pan- 
coast's Literature. Two hour* a week. 

5. The History and Philosophy of Literature. Chaucer's Canter- 

bury Tales. Shakspere's Comedies and Tragedies. Mar- 
lowe and Ben Jonson. Milton's Paradise Lost. Words- 
worth. Taine's History of Literature. Theses. Two 
hours a week. 

H. Anglo-Saxon (elementai-y course). Old English Grammar 
(Smith, CookJ. The Gospel of John. Cook's Judith. 
Earle's Philology. Two hours a week. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

7. Anglo-Saxon (advancecV course). Middle English Phonology 
and Inflection. Skeat's Piers Plowman. The Wyclifhte, 
Tyndale and later Bible Versions. Anglo-Saxon Poetry : 
Beowulf (Harrison and Sharp's Edition). Skeat's Princi- 
ples of Etymology. Siever's Grammar. Two hours a 
week. 



32 THE COLLEGE 



For Graduates. 



8. Poetry and Criticism. A study of the art of poetry in general 

and of the principles of criticism. 
To be omitted in 1899-1900. 

9. The Rise and Progress of the Drama from the Mystery Plays 

to the Seventeenth Century. Ward's Dramatic Literature, 
Symond's Predecessors of Shakspere. Manly's Pre-Shak- 
sperian Plays. Special editions. 

10. Seminary in Shakspere. The language, metrical forms, 

sources of plot and incident, construction of plays, compar- 
ative study of his art. 
To be omitted in 1899-1900. 

11. The Literary Study of the Bible. Critical survey of the fol- 

lowing Books: The Psalm 3, Job, Isaiah, Proverbs and 
other gnomic literature. Influence of the Bible on literary 
development and form. 

12. Anglo-Saxon Poetry. Comparative Grammar and Philology. 

The Foreign Element in English. 

13. The Rise and Progress of English Fiction. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed 
courses 1 — 6, and one of the courses for graduates. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Williams. 

1. Psychology. Lectures, with text-books. Theses. Three hours 

a week. 

Required, in the Junior year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

2. Logic. Lectures, with text-books. Two hours a week. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 33 

The aim of this course is to study logic in life ; therefore the 
system of Aristotle is not used. 

3. Ethics. ( 'ri'ticisms and Discussions. Two hours a week. 

The work is in the main to discuss and criticise freely. The 
students are urged to have opinions, to state them clearly 
and defend them sharply. 

4. Philosophy. Lectures. Theses. Three hours a week. 

The instructor, following the lead of his own ideas, hopes to 
give each student a deeper insight into, and a firmer grasp 
of the forces that shape life. 

Elective in the Senior year, with any study in a subject in 
which two or three years of connected work have already 
been completed, or with Physics 4, as a requirement of all 
candidates for a degree. 



For Graduates. 

Epistemology. Lectures. Theses. Three hours a week. 

The work ottered is a study of the Critical Philosophy. 
This demands at least two years. The first year is given 
to the Prolegomena, and the Practical Reason, and to the 
works that prepared the way for Kant. The second year 
is given to Kritik der reinen Verrwnfl. 

Elective to students who have taken courses 3 and 4. 



HISTORY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Mr. Smith. 

1. Mediaeval History. Two hours a week. 

Emerton's Introduction to the Middle Ages, Thatcher and 
Schwill*s History of the Middle Age and Brice's Holy 
Roman Empire are used but recitation work is supple- 
mented by reports on private reading and investiga- 
tion. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Professor NOBLE. 
2. American History. The Growth and Development of the 
American Union. Lectures, with text books and topical 
reports. Three hours a week. 



34 THE COLLEGE 

This course includes the history of the Colonization of North 
America, and of the United States. 

Professor Battle. 

3. English History. Lectures, with text-books, and topical re- 

ports. Three hours a week. 

This course gives a general survey of the field of English 
History. Special attention is directed to the development 
of the Constitution, and the great epochs wherein our po- 
litical, industrial and religious institutions had their ori- 
gin and experienced changes. Text-book : Ransome's 
Advanced History of England. 

4. Constitutional History. Lectures with text-books and topical 

reports. Three hours a week. 

A preliminary study is made of the constitutional develop- 
ment of Greece, Rome, France, Germany, Switzerland, 
Austro-Hungary and Sweden-Norway. Special attention 
is then given to the constitutional development of Great 
Britain and the United States. The great cases of the 
Supreme Court of the United States are studied somewhat 
in detail. Lectures are also given on the Constitution of 
North Carolina and on International Law. Text-books : 
. Wilson's State, Inlander's Constitution of the United 
States. 

Courses 2 and 8 are especially useful to the proper study of 
American Constitutional History. 

Elective, in the Senior year, with Political and Social Science 
1 as a requirement of all candidates for a degree. 

5. The Constitutional and Political History of North Carolina. 

Lectures, with topical reports, and theses. One hour a 

week. 

In this course no text-books are used. Lectures are given, 
and investigation into the Colonial Records, Acts and 
Journals of the Legislature, public documents, manu- 
scripts, newspaper files and other printed matter", owned 
by the University and by the North Carolina Historical 
Society, is required. 

f> Old Testament History. Old Testament characters. Lectures 
each Sunday morning at the instance of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. 
This course cannot be counted toward a degree. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION* 35 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Historical Seminary. Original research into topics of the 
history of America or Xorth Carolina. Reports required 
weekly. Two hours a week. 

Elective to graduates, and to special students who have 
passed six hours of work with honor, or have given proof 
of special fitness in the department of History. 

Other courses in History will he prescribed for any students 
prepared for advanced work. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed courses 

1. 2. 4. 5 and 7. 



POLITICAL AND SOCIAL SCIENCE. 

Professor Battle. 

1. History and Principles of Political Economy and Sociology. 

Lectures with text-books and parallel reading. Three hours 
a week. 

This course aims not only to furnish such knowledge of eco- 
nomic and social principles as is useful to business men and 
essential to good citizenship, but also to supply special 
training for those intending to become teachers, preach- 
ers, lawyers, public men. or journalists. 

Elective, in the Senior year, with History 4 as a requirement 
of all candidates for a degree. 

2. Current Questions. Seminary methods applied to the study of 

such questions as the Tariff, Money and Banking, Financial 

Legislation. Divorce and Crime. Theses. Two hours a 

week. 

This course aims to stimulate interest in all problems relat- 
ing to public and social life, and to illustrate proper meth- 
ods of investigating them. It is open to those who have 
obtained honors in course 1 or have shown special fitness 
for the work. 



36 THE COLLEGE 



MATHEMATICS. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Gain and Mr. Henderson. 

1. Algebra, from Quadratics to Determinants (Wentworth's Col- 

lege Algebra). Plane and Solid Geometry (Wells). Four 
hours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

2. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry, with Logarithms (Crock- 

ett). Analytic Geometry (Tanner and Allen). Three 
hours a week.. 

Required, in the Sophomore year, of all candidates for a de- 
gree. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor Cain. " 

3. Solid Analytic Geometry (Tanner and Allen). Differential 

and Integral Calculus (Taylor, Edwards). Three hours a 
week. 

Mr. Henderson. 

4. Projection Drawing (Warren). Surveying (Raymond). Three 

hours a week. 

5. Determinants (Weld, Hanus, and Charles Smith's Solid Ana- 

lytic Geometry). Three hours a ineck. 
Given alternately with course (>. 

Professor Cain and Mr. Henderson. 

(>. Higher Trigonometry (Lock). Differential Equations (Mur- 
ray). Three hours a week. 
Given alternately with course 5. 

Professor Cain. 
7. Higher Algebra, including Theory of Equations. Wentworth's 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION „ 37 

College Algebra. Burnside and Pantou's Theory of Equa- 
tions. Threc'lioars a week. 
Given alternately with courses 8 and 9. 

8. Advanced Differential and Integral Calculus (Byerly, Ed- 

wards. Lectures). Three hours a iveek. 
Given alternately with courses 7 and !). 

9. Quaternions (Hardy). Theory of Complex Functions. Three 

hours a week. 
Given alternately with courses 7 and 8. 

10. The Application of Mathematics to Civil Engineering. Three 

hours a vxek. 

For the benefit of students who desii-e to study Mathemat- 
ics as applied to Civil Engineering a choice of the follow- 
ing courses is offered. One course will be given annually 
but these courses may be taken on successive years : — 

a. Analytic Mechanics and Hydraulics. 

b. Mechanics of Materials. Stresses in Bridges and Roof- 
Trusses. 

c. Graphical Statics, applied to Framed Structures and 
Theory of Retaining Walls. 

d. Mechanics of Engineering. Stresses in Bridges and 
Roof-Trusses. 

e. Analytic Theory of Arches. Graphical Theory of 
Arches. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed, 

with credit, courses 1. 2 and 3. 



PHYSICS. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor GORE. 

1. Physics. A general and rather elementary course. The fun- 

damental facts of the subject presented, and the general 
laws illustrated by experiments. Three hours a week. 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy or Bachelor of Science. 

2. Physics. A general course, more advanced than com-se 1 

with special attention to molecular physics. Lectures, 



38 THE COLLEGE 

with text-books. A series of experiments in physical 
measurements. Three hours a week. 
Required, in the Junior year, of all candidates for a degree. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. Electricity and Magnetism. Lectures, with text-books. Elec- 
trical measurements. Experimental study of dynamo ma- 
chines, electric motors, electric lighting, storage batteries, 
etc. Three hours a iveek. 

■1. Descriptive Astronomy. Two hours a week: 

This course is conducted as a branch of liberal education, 
but enough of mathematics is included to give accuracy to 
the study. 

Elective, in the Senior year, with any study in a subject in 
which two or three years of connected work have already 
been completed, or with Philosophy 4, as a requirement 
of all candidates for a degree. 

5. Theory and Application of Alternating Currents, and Electric 
Transmission of Power. Three hours a 'week. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed 
courses 2, 3 and 4. 



CHEMISTRY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Venable. 
1. Descriptive Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week. 

■ This course covers the general principles of chemistry as 
brought out by a study of the elements and their com- 
pounds, and includes a brief preliminary treatment of 
organic chemistry. The students taking this course must 
perform in the laboratory a given number of experiments, 
thus familiarizing themselves with the characteristics 
and behavior of the various substances lectured upon. 
The experimental work is conducted by Dr. Clarke. 
Required, in the Sophomore year, of candidates for the de- 
cree of Bachelor of Science. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 39 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Biology 2, as a re- 
quirement of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts ; and with Biology 2 or Geology 2 as a requirement 
of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

2. Industrial Chemistry. Lectures. The application of chemis- 

try to the arts and industries. Three hours a week. 

This course includes metallurgy, glass making, pottery, 
foods, clothing, building-materials, explosives, photog- 
raphy etc. 

3. Agricultural Chemistry. Lectures. Three hours a week {fall- 

term) . 

This course includes ^the chemistry of the plant and the soil, 
and the discussion of plant-food etc. Many specimens 
have been collected in the Industrial Museum to illustrate 
courses 2 and 3. 

Associate Professor Baskerville. 

4. Qualitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Two hours a week. 

The student is familiarized with the more common ele- 
ments and their reactions, and is trained to detect the 
various constituents of minerals and similar substances. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Biology 2, or Geol- 
ogy 2, as a requirement of candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Science. 

5. Quantitative Analysis and Assaying. Laboratory work. 

Three hours a week. 

This course is intended to give the student a thorough 
grounding in analytical methods and manipulations. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

Professor Venable and Associate Professor Baskerville. 

6. Organic Chemistry. Lectures with laboratory work. Three- 

hours a week. 

This course in organic chemistry is more extensive than 
course 1. Students are required to make a number of 
organic preparations and to analyze a few typical com- 
pounds. The laboratory work is conducted by Dr. Clarke. 

7. Theoretical and Historical Chemistry. Lectures. Two hours 

a week. 

The lectures in the fall term cover the theories of chemis- 
try ; in the spring term they treat of the historical devel- 
opment of the science. 

3 



40 THE COLLEGE 

8. Quantitative Analysis. Laboratory work. Three or five hours 

a week. 

The student in this course is led further into the study and 
practice of analytical methods. The work may take 
any special direction desired by him, fitting him to be 
an agricultural chemist, iron chemist, manufacturing 
chemist, physician, druggist, or teacher of chemistry. 
Encouragement is given to the student to make original 
researches. 

9. Toxicology and Medical Analysis. Lectures and laboratory 

work. Three hours a week. 

During the fall term qualitative analysis is studied. In the 
spring term the course includes toxicology and urinary 
analysis. This course is open to second year students in 
medicine and pharmacy. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed all 
the above courses except course 9, and submitted a thesis 
upon some research successfully carried out in the lab- 
oratory. 



BIOLOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Wilson. 

1. Elements of Physiology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week {fall term). 

Required, in the Ereshmanyear, of all candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. 

2. General Biology. Lectures, with laboratory work. Thr& 

hours a week. 

An introductory course to the entire subject of Biology, and 
required of those who elect any of the following courses. 
Biology 1 (Elements of Physiology) i-, not a prerequisite for 
this course. 

The laboratory work embraces the study of a number of 
typical animals and plants, and cell structure. In the lec- 
tures the forms to be studied are briefly described, and 
the biological principles which they illustrate are dis- 
cussed. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Chemistry 1, as a 
requirement of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 41 

Arts, with Chemistry 1 or Geology 2 as a requirement of 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy ; and 
with Chemistry 4, or Geology 2, as a requirement of can- 
didates for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

3. Mammalian Anatomy. Laboratory work, with reading and 

conferences. Three hours a week (fall term). 

The anatomy of the cat is worked out in considerable detail. 
Special attention paid to anatomical methods, injection of 
blood vessels, preservation of the brain, etc. This course 
may be pursued simultaneously with Biology 2. 

4. Botany. Laboratory and field work, with reading and confer- 

ences. Three hours a week (spring term). 

Representatives of plant groups not included in Biology 2 
are studied. Identification of flowering plants with Gray's 
manual. Excursions. Prominence given to the "natural 
history " side of the subject This course may be pursued 
simultaneously with Biology 2. 

5. Zoology. Laboratory and field work, with reading and confer- 

ences. Three hours a week (fall term). 

Representatives of animal groups not included in Biology 2 
are studied. Identification of vertebrates with Jordan's 
manual, etc. Excursions. Prominence given to the "nat- 
ural history " side of the subject. 

6. Vertebrate Histology. Lectures, with laboratory work. Three- 

hours a tveek {fall term). 

In the laboratory microscopic preparations illustrating the 
structure of the principal tissues and organs of the verte- 
brate body are made and studied. In this course a knowl- 
edge of elementary microscopic technique is acquired, the 
student becoming familiar with the processes of section 
cutting, staining, mounting, etc. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

7. Microscopic Technique. Laboratory work. Three hours a week 

(fall term). 

The elementary knowledge of microscopic technique ac- 
quired in the previous courses is here supplemented so as 
to fit th e student for independent work. 

8. Vertebrate Embryology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Three hours a week (spring term). 
Segmentation of the ovum and formation of germ layers in 



42 fane college; 

echinoderm, amphibian, and teleost eggs. Fcetai mem- 
branes of mammals. Development of the characteristic- 
vertebrate organs in chick embryos. 

y. Gradtiate Zoology. Laboratory work, with reading and con- 
ferences. Three, five, or more hours a week. 

Morphology (comparative anatomy, histology, and embryo- 
logy) of the invertebrates and vertebrates. After ade- 
quate preparation problems assigned for original research. 
Course intended primarily for those seeking an advanced 
degree with Biology as a subject. Special lines of work, 
involving, if advisable, research, may be prosecuted by 
those who are not applicants for a degree. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with 

credit eourses 2 to 8 inclusive. 



GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Cobb. 

1. Physiography. Lectures, with field work, and recitations. 

Three hours a week (spring term). 

Required, in the Freshman year, of candidates for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science. 

2. General Geology, including Mineralogy. Lectures and recita- 

tions, with laboratory and field work. Three hours a 
week. 

The lectures deal with the more easily explained geologi- 
cal phenomena. Reference is made to Le Conte's Ele- 
ments of Geology. The laboratory work is devoted to the 
study of about fifty important mineral species, and in- 
cludes also a study of disintegration and erosion, struc- 
ture of the fragmental rocks, inetamoryhism, the relation 
of life to rocks, and the preservation of organic re- 
mains. 

Elective, in the Sophomore year, with Chemistry 1 or Biol- 
ogy 2, as a requirement of candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy ; and with Chemistry 4, or Biology 
2, as a requirement of candidates for the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science. 

3. Determinative Mineralogy. Lectures, with laboratory work. 

Dana's text-book of Mineralogy. Two hours a -week (fall 

term). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 43 



For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

4. General Critical Geology. Lectures, with laboratory and 

field work. Dana's Manual of Geology. Theses. Books 
for z-eference : Lyell's Principles of Geology and Geikie's 
Text-book of Geology. Three hours a week. 

This course treats of the history of Geology. The various 
geological theories are considered critically. Problems 
are worked out in the field and in the laboratory. Theses 
must be completed by the first dav of May. 

To be omitted in 1899-1900. 

Given alternately with courses 5 and 6. 

5. Economic Geology. Lectures, with laboratory and field work. 

The general features and formation of ore deposits, fol- 
lowed by a description of the deposits of the ores of iron, 
copper, lead, zinc, silver, gold, and the lesser metals, with 
special reference to North America and to the economic 
geology of North Carolina. Three hours a week ( fall 
term). 

Courses 5 and 6 are given alternately with course 4. 
Elective to students who have completed courses 2 and 3 
and a course in Chemistry. 

6. Economic Geology. Discussion of the distribution and oc- 

currence of coal, petroleum, natural gas, asphalt, building- 
stone, water supply, salines, and minor minerals. Three 
hours a, week, (spring term). 

Courses 5 and (i are given alternately with course 4. 
Elective to students who have completed courses 2 and 3 and 
a course in Chemistry. 

7. Advanced geological field work and special research. Prob- 

lems assigned individually and work adapted to the pro- 
fessional needs of the student. Seminary once a week, 
and individual conferences. Three hours a loeek. 

This course may be taken with advantage in successive 
years. 

8. Petrography. Lectures, laboratory work and theses. Tiro hours 

a week (spring term). 

Elective to students who have completed courses 2 (or 9) 
3. 5 and 6 and Chemistry 4. 



4:4 THE COI/LEOE 

9. Summer Course. Physical and Structural Geology, including 

Mineralogy. Daily lectures, with work in the laboratory, 

and in the field around King's Mountain, North Carolina 

for a period of four w T eeks. 

This course counts three hours a week for one term. 
Omitted in 1899. 

1 0. Summer Course. Advanced geological field work and special 

research. Study of the Deep River and Wadesboro areas 

of the Newark rocks. A brief examination of Potomac, 

Eocene, Lafayette and Columbia deposits. 

This course begins at Chapel Hill, June 6, 1899, and contin- 
ues four weeks, counting three hours a week for one term. 

In addition to the above courses, short series of lectures are 

from time to time given to the students of geology by 

members of the North Carolina Geological Survey. The 

lectures of 1898-99 include the following : — 

Coastal Plain Geology and Artesian Water Supplies in 

Eastern North Carolina. 
Water Powers and Their Measurement. 
The Geological Map of North Carolina. 
The Mica and Kaolin Deposits and Their Origin. 
Origin and Distribution of Soils and Clays. 
Miscellaneous Mineral Deposits. 
The Building Stones of North Carolina. 

Professor Holmes. 
The Geological and Geographical Distribution of Forests. 

Mr. William Willard Ashe. 
The Igneous Origin of Certain Ore Deposits. 
Veins and Vein Structure. 
Corundum and Related Minerals. 
Superficial Alteration of Mineral Veins. 
The Gem Industry in North Carolina. 

Dr. Joseph Hyde Pratt. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed with 
credit all the above courses, except 1 and 9, and has sub- 
mitted a creditable thesis embodying the results of origi- 
nal investigation. 



PEDAGOGY. 

For Undergraduates. 

Professor Noble. 
1. The Science of Education. Lloyd Morgan's Psychology for 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 45 

Teachers. DeGarmo's Essentials of Method. The practi- 
cal application of scientific principles to the teaching of 
elementary branches. A brief study of modern educa- 
tional problems. Three hours a week (fall term). 

2. The Art of Teaching-. McMurray's General Method. Fitch's 

Lectures on Teaching. A careful study of the principles 

and methods involved insucessfully teaching those studies 

usually taught in the best public and private Primary 

Sch'x>ls. Three hours a wiele [spring term). 

Practice in teaching the elementary branches, and the 
preparation of model lessons according to pedagogical 
principles have a place in both courses. 

For Undergraduates and Graduates. 

3. The General History of Education. The development of edu- 

cational ideals in the })ast. The effect of the pedagogical 
doctrines of the great educators of the past, upon modern 
educational systems. Williams's History of Education. 
Monroe's Educational Ideal. Three hours a week (fall 
term). 

4. The Philosophy of Education. Posencranz's Philosophy of 

Education. Science and Practice of Education. Herbart. 
Comparative study of the different systems of education in 
the several States of the Union. The development and 
arrangement of a High School course. Three hours a week 
(spring term). 
Pedagogical theses will be required in all four courses. 

5. The study of Childhood in transforming Modern Methods of 

Studying and Teaching Educational Science. Two hours 
a week. 

The aim of this course is to investigate minutely the attitude 
of society toward the child in ancient and modern life, as 
a basis of future study in Paidology. 

This is a course of research. It is proposed to embody the 
results in printed theses. 

Given alternately with course 6. 

6. Herbartian Pedagogy. Two hours a week. 

The attempt is made in this course to investigate the Her- 
bartian movement in Germany"and the United States. 
The works of Rein, Stoy, Ziller, Lange and others are 
studied. 

Given alternately with course 5. 



46 



THE COLLEGE 



SCHEDULE OF HOURS 





8:45 


1 

9:45 


10:40 




Greek 8(10) 


Greek 1 (I) 


Greek 2 




Latin 1(1) 


English 7 


Latin 1 (II) 




German 2 


Philosophy 2 


French 1 (I & It) 




German 3 


Physics 1 (I) 


English 2 (II) 




English 1 (II ) 


Biology 2 


English 5 


M. 


English 2 (I) 
Mathematics 1 (IV) 
Mathematics 2 (11) 
Physics 4 
Chemistry 7 
Geology 4 (5) 
Greek 7 


Geology 2 


History 3 




Greek 4 


Greek 1 (I) 




Latin 1 (I) 


Latin 2 (I) 


Latin 1 (II) 




German 1 (I) 


English 1 (IV) 


German 2 




French 1 (III) 


English 10 


German 3 




History 2 (11) 


Philosophy 1 


English 2 (1) 


Tu. 


Math! (II &II) 


Mathematics 2 (II) 


Chemistry 2 




Chemistry 7 


Biology 9 


Pedagogy 1 






Polit. & Social Sci. 1 


Pol. & Social Sci. 3 




Latin 1 (1) 


Greek 1 (II) 


Greek 2 




German 1(1) 


Latin 2(1) 


Latin 1 (II) 




French! (Ill) 


French 3 


French 1 (I& II) 




English 4 


Philosophy 2 


English 2 (II) 




History 2 (II) 


Mathematics 2 (II) 


English 5 


W. 


Math. 1(11 &III) 


Physics 1 (I) 
Chemistry 2 


History 3 






Biology 9 


• 




Greek 7 


Greek 8 (10) 


Greek 1 (I) 




Latin 1(1) 


English 1 (IV) 


Latin 1 (II) 




German 2 


English 3 


Latin 2 (II) 




German 3 


Philosophy 1 


French 2 




English 2 (I) 


Biology 9 


French 3 


Th. 


Math. 1 (II & III) 




Mathematics 2 (1) 




Physics 4 




chemistry 2 




Geology 4 




Pedagogy 1 




German 1 (I) 


Greek 1(1) 


Greek 2 




French 1 (III) 


Latin 2 (I) 


French 1 (I& II) 




English 1 (I) 


English 1 (IV) 


English 1 (II) 




English 4 


Philosophy 1 


English 2 (II) 




History 2 (II) 


Mathematics 2 (II) 


English 7 


P. 


Math. 1 (II & J 1 1 ) 
Physics 3 
Geology 7 


Polit. & Social Sci. 1 


History 3 




Greek 3 


Biology 5 (4) 


Biology 5 (4) 


S. 


Geology 7 







Roman numerals indicate sections ; arable numerals in parentheses indicate 



SCHEDULE OF HOURS FOE EECTUBE8 



47 



FOR LECTURES. 




Greek 4(5) 
Philosophy 4 
History 1 
History 7 
' Physics 2 
' 'hemistry 1 
Biology 1 
Geology 1 



Greek 6 
Latin 1 (III) 
Latin 6 
English 11 
Philosophy 3 
Physics 1 (II) 
i 'hemistry 6 
Geology 2 
Pe lagogy 3 



Greek 4 (5) 
Latin 12 
Philosophy 4 
History 7 
History 1 
Physics 2 
Chemistry 1 
Biology a 
Geology 1 



Latin 1 (III) 
Latin 6 
English 6 
Philosophy 6 
Mathematics 1(1) 
Physics 1 (II) 
( 'hemistry 6 
Geology 2 
Pedagogy 3 
Poli & Social Sci. 3 



Greek 6 
Latin 10 (12) 
Philosophy 4 
Mathematics 1 (i ) 
Physics 2 
Physics 1 (I) 
chemistry 1 



Biology 5 <4> 



Greek 7 
Latin 1 (III) 
Latin 2 (II) 
French 2 
French 3 
English 13 
History 5 
Mathematics 1 (I) 
Mathematics 2(1) 



Greek 1 (II) 
German 1 (II) 
Spanish 1 
English 1(1) 
English (5 
English 12 
History 2 (I) 
History 4 

Mathematics 1 (IV) 
Mathematics 3 



Chemistry 1 (I) 
< hemistry 5 
Chemistry 8 
Chemistry 9 



Philology 1 



Physics 3 
i hemistry 9 
( hemistry 5 
( hemistry 8 
i hemistry 1 (II) 
Biology 1 (I) 
Biology 3 
Geology 3 (8) 



Latin 5 
Greek 11 
German 4 
("^reek 4 



Latin 2 (II) 
French 2 
English 1 (II) 
English 7 
Mathematics 1 (I) 
Mathematics 2 (I) 
Geology 4 (5) 



Greek 1 (II) 
German 1 ill) 
French 1 (II) 
English 1(1) 
English 11 
Spanish 1 
His;ory 2 (Ii 
History 4 

Mathematics 1 (IV) 
Mathematics 3 



Philology 1 
Physics 2 (experimental) 
Chemistry 1 (III) 
( hemistry 4 
( 'hemistry 5 
• hemistry 8 
Biology 1 (II) 
Biology 3 
Biology 7 (8) 



| Latin 5 
Physics 3 English 12 

Chemistry 1 (IV) 
Chemistry 5 
Chemistry 8 
Biology 2 
Biologv 7 (8) 
Geology 3 (8) 
Biologv 1 (III) 



Greek 1 (II) 
Latin 1 (III) 
German 1 (II) 
French 1 (II) 
Spanish 1 
English 6 
History 2(1) 
History 4 
Mathematics i 
Mathematics 3 



IV) 



Biologv 5 (4 
English 13 



i Greek 11 
Physics 2 (experimental) 
Chemistry 1 (V) 
chemistry 4 
( hemistry 5 
( hemistry 8 
Biology 2 
Biology 7 (8) 
Biology 1 (IV) 
Geology 7 



alternating half courses in spring term. 



COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES. 



The College prescribes three courses of study, of four years 
each, leading respectively to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
(A.B.), Bachelor of Philosophy (Pli.B.), and Bachelor of Science 
S.B.). The studies of the Freshman and Sophomore years are fixed 
in each course. Required and elective studies amounting to a total 
of seventeen hours a week are prescribed in the Junior and 
Senior years. The courses are as follows : — 

I. BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies : Greek 1(4)*: Latin 1 (4): English 1(3); Math- 
ematics 1(4). 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies : English 2,(3) ; Mathematics 2(3) : one study 
from the following group : Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3) ; one study from 
the following group : Chemistry 1(3). Biology 2(3) ; one study from 
the following group: Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3). German 1(8), 
French 1(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies: Philosophy 1(3): Physics 2(3) ; one study 
from the following group: Greek, Latin, German. French. 
English. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES : Any studies in the College except those 
required of Freshmen in any course leading to a degree. 

^Numerals in parentheses indicate number of hours in each course. 



COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES 49 

Senior Year. 

' Required Studies : English 3(1) : one study from the follow- 
ing group: Political and Social Science 1(3). History 3(3); one 
study. in a subject in which two or three years of connected work 
have already been completed, or one study from the following 
group : Philosophy 4(3) ; Physics 4(2). 

Elective Studies : Any studies in the College except English 
rt and those studies required of Freshmen and Sophomores in any 
course leading to a degree. 



II. BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Freshman Year. 

Required Studies : English 1(3); Mathematics 1(4) ; Physics 
1(3); History 1(2); one study from the following group: Greek 
1(4), Latin 1(4). 

Sophomore Year. 

Required Studies : English 2(3) ; Mathematics 2(3) : one study 
from the following group : Greek 2(3), Latin 2(3.) ; one study 
from the following group: German 1(3), French 1(3); one study 
from the following group : ( 'hemistry 1(3), Biology 2(3), Geology 
2(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies : Philosophy 1(3) ; Physics 2(3). 
Elective Studies : Any st udies in the College except those 
required of Freshmen in any course leading to a degree. 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies ; English 3(1); one study from the follow 
ing group. : I^olitical and Social Science 1(3), History 3(3) ; one 



50 THE COLLE&E 

study in a subject in which two or three years of connected work 
have already been completed, or one study from the following 
group: Philosophy 4(3), Physics 4(2). 

Elective Studies : Any studies in the College except English 
6 and those studies required of Freshmen and Sophomores in any 
course leading to a degree. 



III. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 
Freshman Year. 

Required Studies: German 1(3): English 1(3): Mathematics 
1(4) ; Physics 1(3) ; Biology 1 and Geology 1(3). 

Sophomore Year. > > v - 

Required Studies : English 2(3) : Mathematics 2(3) ; Chemis- 
try 1(3) ; one study from the following group : German 2(3), French 
1(3), History 1(3) ; one study from the following group: Chemistry 
4(2), Biology 2(3), Geology 2(3). 

Junior Year. 

Required Studies : Philosophy 1(3): Physics 2(3); one study 
from the following group : German, French, Mathematics, Chem- 
istry, Biology, Geology. 

Elective Studies ; Any study in the College. • 

Senior Year. 

Required Studies : English 3(1) : one study from the follow- 
ing group: Political and Social Science 1(3), History 3(3): one 
study in a subject in which two or three years of connected work 
have already been completed, or one study from the following 
group : Philosophy 4(3), Physics 4(2). 

Elective Studies : Any studies in the ( lollege except Eng- 
lish 6 and those studies required of Freshmen and Sophomores in 
any course leading to a degree. 



bEGREES 5i 

GRADES OF SCHOLARSHIP. 

At the end of every term, or upon the completion of a subject, 
students are assigned, according- to their proficiency, to one of 
six grades of scholarship, designated respectively by the figures 
1, 2, 3. 4, 5 and 6. Grade ~> denotes failure, grade 6 that the sub- 
ject must be studied again in course. 

An instructor may exclude from a course any student who, in 
•his judgment, neglects his work. 






DEGREES. 



A student is not recommended for a degree until he has passed in 
all studies prescribed for that degree, and in the required number 
of elective studies. 

Degrees with Distinction. 

A member of the Senior Class is recommended by the Faculty 
either for an ordinary degree or for a degree with distinction in 
one of three grades. 

The conditions under which a candidate is recommended for a 
degree with distinction are as follows : — 

If he has attained to grade 2 in one half of all work for four 
years, he is recommended for a degree cum laude. 

If he has attained to grade 2 in five sixths of all work for four- 
years, or grade 1 in one half of all work for four years, he is re- 
commended for a degree magna ram laude. 

If he has attained to grade 1 in five sixths of all work for four 
years, he is recommended for a degree summa cum laude. 

Commencement Parts. 

Every member of the Senior Class is required to write a thesis 
or an oration for graduation. Those members of the Senior Class 
who elect .theses -shall announce their subjects on February 1 



52 THE COLLEGE 

to the Professor of English who shall, in turn, announce them to 
the professrrs in the departments concerned. On May 2 the 
theses shall be read before the professors from manuscript, sub- 
ject to criticism and correction. The corrected theses must be 
submitted to the Registrar in typewritten form on or before 
May 15. 

The number of orations is limited to four. The candidates must 
be members of the academic department and must announce their 
subjects to the Professor of English on February 1. The orations 
shall be delivered in private before a committee of the Faculty on 
May 1. The four successful candidates shall be known as the 
Commencement Orators of the Senior Class. 



CERTIFICATES. 

A certificate is granted to a student who has completed, in any 
department, all work required for a degree together with other 
elective work in the same department. (See under the several 
departments of instruction). 

COURSES FOR STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR A 

DEGREE. 

Three courses of study, each extending over a period of two 
years, are suggested to students who are unable to complete any 
course leading to a degree. These brief courses are intended to 
include subjects that have a direct practical value for young men 
intending to be teachers, lawyers or physicians. Studies amounting 
to a total of sixteen hours a week are required and may be selected 
from the following groups : — 

I. For those intending to teach. 

FIRST Year : Greek. Latin, German. French, English, Mathe- 
matics, Elementary Physics, Physiology, Physiography. 



COTJRSES FOR STUDENTS NOT CANDIDATES FOR A DEGREE 53 

Second Year : Greek. Latin. German. French. English, Phil- 
osophy. History, Constitutions and Laws of the United States and 
of North Carolina. Mathematics. Physics, Chemistry. Biology. Ge- 
ology, History and Science of Education. 

II. For those intending to practice law. 

FIRST Year : Latin. English, History, Mathematics. Physics, 
Chemistry, Geology. 

Second Year : Latin. English. Philosophy, History and Histor- 
ical Research. Constitutions of England, of the United States, 
and of North Carolina, Political Economy, Mathematics. 

III. For those intending to practice medicine. 

First Year : Greek, Latin, German, French. English. Mathe- 
matics, Elementary Physics, Physiology, Physiography. 

Second Year : Greek, Latin, German. French. English, Chem- 
istry. Practical Biology. Geology. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



ADMISSION. 



Graduates of the University of North Carolina and of other 
universities and colleges of good standing are. on application to 
the Faculty, ordinarily admitted to advanced courses of instruc- 
tion, free of charge for tuition. An applicant for admission 
unless a graduate of the University of North Carolina, is required 
to present a certificate of scholarship and character, or his di- 
ploma, if he has a degree. 

Graduate students are admitted to advanced courses in the 
College as well as to those courses especially provided for them. 
They enjoy the same privileges with other members of the Uni- 
versity. 

Applications for admission to the higher courses of study should 
be presented at the beginning of the College year. 

DEGREES. 

The University offers to graduate students advanced work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Arts (A. M.), Master of Philo- 
sophy (Ph. M.), Master of Science (S. M.), and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy (Ph. D.). It is the established policy of the University to 
confer no degrees except after study and residence and none of an 
honorary nature may be given. 

Candidacy. 

Any Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Philosophy, or Bachelor of 
Science, of the University of North Carolina may become a can- 
didate for the corresponding master's degree, or for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 



DE&BEE8 55 

A graduate student from another university or college, who 
wishes to become a candidate for an advanced degree, but has 
not completed undergraduate courses required for a bachelor's 
degree in this University, must make good such deficiency before 
his candidacy for the advanced degree can be accepted. A 
candidate must make written application to the Faculty and state 
three branches of study, a major and two minors, in which he 
wishes to prepare himself for the desired degree. Every candi- 
date for an advanced degree must submit for the approval of the 
Faculty a thesis on some question connected with his major sub- 
ject. The thesis must be submitted on or before the first day of 
May in the last year of study for the degree. 

An application for an advanced decree must be accompanied by 
the registration fee of ten dollars. 

The Degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Philosophy, and 
Master of Science. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts, Master of Phi- 
losophy, or Master of Science, who has not received the corre- 
sponding bachelor's degree from the University of North Caro- 
lina, is required to pursue, in residence at the University, at 
least three courses of study of a minimum of fifteen hours a 
week, for one College year. A candidate who has received a 
bachelor's degree from the University of North Carolina may 
be granted the corresponding master's degree after at least two 
years of study, as a non-resident student, in work prescribed by 
the Faculty : but he must satisfy the Faculty by examination, or 
by his thesis, that he is worthy of recommendation for the 
degree. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must include either 
Greek or Latin in his graduate studies. 

The Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is required 
to pursue, in residence at the University, a prescribed course of 
4 



66 THE COLLEGE^ 

advanced study and research. In general a term of three yeafs is 
required, but the degree may be secured in two years in cases of 
exceptional preliminary training in the major subject. 

These requirements of residence and study are, however, en- 
tirely secondary. The degree is conferred not simply for faithful 
study in a determinate field of work for a prescribed period, but 
because of a high attainment in a special branch of learning, 
which the candidate must have manifested not only by examina- 
tion, but by a thesis which gives evidence of independent re- 
search, and contributes to knowledge. The candidate should 
choose his major subject in a department in which he has al- 
ready pursued, for a considerable period, a systematic course of 
study. To receive this degree, a knowledge of French and Ger- 
man will be found indispensable in most instances. The thesis 
must be accepted before the candidate may be admitted to exam- 
ination. The examinations are both written and oral. They de- 
mand a minute knowledge of a special field of work as well as a 
general acquaintance with the department of learning in which 
the candidate offers himself for the degree. 

ADMISSION OF WOMEN. 

Graduates and advanced students from institutions for the train- 
ing of women will be admitted to the Graduate School and to such 
higher courses of instruction as the Faculty may direct. They 
will be admitted on the same conditions with men and enjoy the 
same privileges. Graduates of accredited institutions receive free 
tuition. Others will be charged a fee according to the amount of 
work taken. 



PECUNIAEY AID AND EXPENSES. 



MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal in Mathematics. (Established in 1874.) 
A gold medal is offered by J. Allen Holt and Martin H. Holt, the 
principals of Oak Ridge Institute, to that student who shall take 
the highest rank in Mathematics 3. No student will be recom- 
mended for the medal unless he attain to grade 2. 

The Hume Medal in English Composition. (Established 
in 1890.) A gold medal is offered by Professor Thomas Hume to 
that member of the Senior Class who shall present the best essay 
or thesis on the occasion of his graduation. 

The Mangum Medal in Oratory. (Established in 1878.) 
The Misses Mangum. of Orange County, offer in memory of 
their father, Willie Person Mangum, a gold medal to that member 
of the Senior Class who shall deliver the best oration at Com- 
mencement. 

The Representatives' Medal. (Established in 1881.) The 
Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies offer a gold medal 
to that member of either society who shall deliver the best oration 
in the annual oratorical contest between representatives of the 
two societies on the day before Commencement. 

The Hill Prize in History. (Established in 1890.) A prize 
of fifteen dollars is offered by John Sprunt Hill, of New York City, 
a member of the Class of 1889, for the best thesis on some phase of 
the history of North Carolina, the subject to be selected by the 
Professor of History. 

The Kerr Prize in Geology or Mineralogy. (Establish- 
ed in 1889.) A prize of fifty dollars is offered by William H. Kerr, 
of Baltimore, Md., in memory of his father, Professor Washington 



58 tllE COLLEGE 

Caruthers Kerr, to any undergraduate or graduate student, for the 
best thesis containing' original work in the geology or mineralogy 
of North Carolina. 

The Superintendents' Prize in Pedagogy. (Established 
in 1891.) The Superintendents' Association of North Carolina 
will print the best thesis submitted in Pedagogy. 

The Greek Prize. (Established in 1887.) A prize of ten dol- 
lars is offered to that member of the Sophomore Class who shall 
present the best rendering into English of selected passages of 
Greek not previously read. 

The Worth Prize in Philosophy. (Established in 1883.) 
Mr. Charles Williams Worth, in memory of his father, David 
Gaston Worth, of the class of 1853, will print the best thesis sub- 
mitted by a student in Philosophy 4. 

The Early English Text Society Prize. A special prize 
is offered by the Early English Text Society, of London, for ad- 
vanced work in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English. 



SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Cameron Scholarships. (Established in 1892.) The 
heirs of Paul Carrington Cameron founded, in his memory, ten 
scholarships of the value of sixty dollars each. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies' 
Scholarships. (Established in 1893.) The Dialectic and Phil- 
anthropic Literary Societies of the University founded two schol- 
arships of the value of sixty dollars each, recipients of which shall 
give assistance in the library. 

The Moore Scholarships. (Established in 1881.) Bartholo- 
mew Figures Moore, of Raleigh, bequeathed five thousand dollars, 
the interest of which shall be devoted to paying the tuition of stu- 
dents. 

The Mary Ann Smith Scholarships. (Established in 1S91.) 
Miss Mary Ann Smith bequeathed thirty-seven thousand dollars 



SCHOLARSHIPS 59 

for the foundation of scholarships, the number of scholarships to 
be determined by the amount of income. 

The Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships. (Established in 
1885.) Miss Mary Ruffin Smith bequeathed to the University, in 
memory of her brother, Dr. Francis Jones Smith, a valuable tract 
of land in Chatham County, of about fourteen hundred and sixty 
acres, known as Jones' Grove. The will provides that "the rents 
of the land, or the interest of the purchase money, if sold, shall be 
used to pay the tuition of such poor students as the Faculty shall 
appoint. " 

The Speight Scholarships. (Established in 1895.) The 
late Mrs. Mary Shepherd Speight bequeathed ten thousand dol- 
lars to the University. The income shall be used to pay the tui- 
tion of needy students : but if tuition is ever made free, the income 
shall be used toward paying- the salaries of the professors. 

The WOOD Scholarship. (Established in 1892.) Mrs. Mary 
Sprunt Wood, of Wilmington, has founded, in memory of her late 
husband. Dr. Thomas Fanning- Wood, a scholarship of the value 
of sixty dollars. 

The Weil Scholarship. (Established in 1898.) This fund, 
established by Henry Weil, of Goldsboro, furnishes one scholar- 
ship of the value of sixty dollars. 

The Murphy Scholarship. (Established in 1898.) This 
scholarship of sixty dollars is given by James D. Murphy, of Ashe- 
ville. 

By the terms of these bequests no scholarships may be given to 
students of the professional schools of Law, Medicine and Phar- 
macy.. 

All applications for scholarships must be iiled in the President's 
Office on or before August 15, and must be in the regular form 
prescribed by the University. Blank forms are supplied on appli- 
cation to the Registrar. 



60 THE COLLEGE 

FREE TUITION. 

By an act of the Legislature in 1887, free tuition is given, in the 
College, to candidates for the ministry, to the sons of ministers, to' 
young men under bodily infirmity, to teachers and young men pre- 
paring to teach. 

LOAN FUNDS. 

The Deems Fund. (Established in 1879.) A fund of six hun- 
dred dollars was established by Dr. Charles F. Deems, late pastor 
of the Church of the Strangers, New York City, formerly a Pro- 
fessor in the University, in memory of his son, Lieutenant Theo- 
dore Disosway Deems. In 1881 the fund was greatly enlarged, 
through the munificence of Mr. William H. Vanderbilt, by a gift 
of ten thousand dollars, "as an addition to the Deems Fund, to be 
loaned to indigent students of the University." 

The Lake Fund. (Established in 1894.) A fund of three hun- 
dred dollars has been established by Mr. Henry Steers Lake, of 
the class of 1898, to be used, at the discretion of the President, in 
helping students. Mr. Lake added three hundred dollars to this 
fund in 1895. 

Applications for loans will not be considered unless accompanied 
by testimonials from responsible persons as to poverty and merit. 
The funds are limited in amount and are loaned only on the secur- 
ity of two approved signatures and at the. legal rate of interest. 

By the terms of these bequests no loans may be made to students 
in the professional schools of Law, Medicine and Pharmacy. 

All applications for loans must be filed in the President's Office 
on or before August IT). 

EXPENSES. 

Fvery effort is made to reduce to the lowest point the necessary 



DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS 61 

expenses of an education at the University. The charges for 
each of the two terms are as follows : — 

Tuition fee $30.00 

Registration fee ■ . 5.00 

Medical and Infirmary fee 3.00 

Gymnasium fee 1.25 

Library fee 2.00 

Total $41.25 

Students taking courses in the laboratories are charged a small 
fee for materials. The library fee is one dollar a term for members 
of the Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies. Good 
board is furnished at Commons for eight dollars a month. A few 
students earn their board at Commons by waiting on the tables. 
In private clubs board may be reduced to a minimum of six dollars 
a month*. The entire animal expenses need not exceed three hun- 
dred dollars, and they may be reduced to two hundred dollars. - 

Every student must keep on deposit with the Bursar two dollars 
as security for damages. Willful damage to University property 
is charged to the perpetrator, if known : otherwise it is assessed 
upon all students of the University. Any balance is returned to 
the student at the end of the year. 



DORMITORY ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The South. Old East. Old West. New East and New West build- 
ings contain 'one hundred and twenty double rooms, available for 
the accommodation of students. The rooms are unfurnished but 
there is no charge for service in addition to the rents. All rooms 
are fitted with electric lights. For these a fee of 371 cents per 
month is charged. 

The prices of rooms in the several buildings are as follows : — 

South Building. 
1st floor — corner rooms, $6. 
— inside rooms. $4. 



62 THE COLLEGE 

2nd and 3rd floors — corner rooms, $10. 
— inside rooms, $8. 

Old West and Old East Buildings. 

1st floor — corner rooms, $6. 
— inside rooms, $4. 
2nd and 3rd floors — corner rooms, $10. 
— inside rooms, $8. 

New West Building. 

1st floor— $4. ♦ 

2nd and 3rd floors — $8. 

New East Building. 
1st floor— $4. 
2nd and 3rd floor — end rooms, $8. 

— middle rooms, $6. 
Prices are quoted lor a single term. When a room has two oc- 
cuants, the price is reduced one half. 

ASSIGNMENT OF ROOMS. 

Rooms for 1899-1900 will be assigned on Saturday, September 16, 
1899, and on Tuesday, January, 2, 1900. Previous occupants of 
rooms, if not at the University on these dates, will forfeit their 
right to their rooms. 

(-lass seniority will determine preference in the drawing of va- 
cant rooms. 



THE COLLEGE. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Admission into the Freshman Class. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class are admitted 
by examination or by certificate. Examinations for admission are 
held in September. The University admits, without examination, 
students who present certificates from the principals of their 
schools. These certificates must be on the blank form provided 
on application to the Registrar. The right is, however, reserved 
to examine students, when, in the opinion of the President, such 
a course is necessary. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

The requirements for admission into the Freshman Class in the 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts are as fol- 
lows : — 

1. Greek. Three books of Xenophon's Anabasis, with ques- 
tions on the more usual forms and constructions : simple narrative 
in English, based upon Xenophon's Anabasis, to be translated into 
Greek. 

2. Latin. Two books of Caesar's Gallic War ; four orations of 
Cicero : six books of Vergil's Aeneid : Latin Grammar, including 
prosody : simple narrative in English, based upon the prose read, 
to be translated into Latin. 

Instructors should teach ' L he Roman method of pronouncing- 
Latin. 

3. English. Grammar : Elements of Rhetoric. Every candi- 
date is required to write a short composition, correct in spelling. 
punctuation, grammar, and division into paragraphs, upon one of 
several subjects announced at the time of the examination. In 



64 THE COLLEGE 

1899 and 1890, the subjects will be chosen from one or more of the 
following- works : — 

Shakespere's Merchant of Venice, Milton's Comus, Irving's 
Tales of a Traveller, Macaulay's Life of Samuel Johnson, Scott's 
Ivanhoe, and Lady of the Lake, Longfellow's Evangeline, Web- 
ster's First Bunker Hill Oration, Defoe's History of the Plague 
in London. 

The candidate is expected to read all the books named, and 
to give evidence in his composition that he is acquainted with the 
important parts of the^book from which the subject of his compo- 
sition is taken, and with the life of the author. 

The books for the entrance examinations in 1901 and 1902 are 
also given that teachers of preparatory schools may be induced to 
use these lists. 

For reading and practice : The Merchant of Venice, Pope's Iliad. ' 
books 1, 6, 22 and 24, The Coverley Papers in The Spectator, 
Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, Scott's Ivanhoe, Cooper's The 
Last of the Mohicans, Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal, George El- 
iot's Silas Marner. For class study and practice: Macbeth, Mil- 
ton's Comus, L' Allegro and H'Penseroso, Burke's Speech on Con- 
ciliation with America, Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addi- 
son. 

4. History. The histories of Greece, Rome and the United 
States. 

5. Mathematics. The whole of a good school Arithmetic : 
a good school Algebra through Progression and Logarithms : a 
thorough preparation in College Algebra to Quadratic Equa- 
tions. 

Beginning with September, 1900, three books of Plane Geom- 
etry will be required. 

The following- books are recommended as useful in preparation 
for the examination in Mathematics : Robinson's Practical Arith- 
metic, Lock and Scott's Arithmetic, Wells', Newcomb's or Went- 
worth's Algebra. 

The Degrees of Bachelor of Philosophy and Bachelor of Science. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in the course 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 65 

leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy may omit the exam- 
ination in Greek. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in the course 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science may omit the exam- 
nations in Greek and in Latin. 

Times and Places op Examinations. 

All candidates for admission into the Freshman Class in any 
course leading to a degree must assemble in Gerrard Hall at 9 a. 
M. Wednesday, September 1.1, for preliminary registration. (For 
final registration, see page 68.) They will there be assigned to 
rooms for examination. 

Order of Examinations. 

Wednesday, September 13. 
10-1. Latin. 3-5. History and Geography. 

Thursday, September Ify. 
10-1. Mathematics. 3-5. English. 

Friday, September 15. 
10-1. Greek. 

Arrangements have been made with certain schools in the state 
whereby examinations for admission may be held in May also, at 
the schools. 

A student who fails to pass in any subject required for admis- 
sion will be conditioned in that subject. Such conditions must be 
removed before the beginning of the Sophomore year. He will 
receive no final mark in the department in which such condition 
occurs until the condition is removed. Nor will he be admitted to 
the work of the Sophomore year in any department until all en- 
trance. conditions are removed. 

II. Admission to Advanced Standing. 

A candidate for advanced standing may be admitted to the 



66 THE COLLEGE 

Sophomore, Junior, or Senior class, with or without complete ex- 
amination. He is subject not only to the examinations required 
of candidates for admission into the Freshman Class, but to spe- 
cial examinations both in all the required studies already pursued 
by the class which he desires to enter, and in as many elective 
studies as would have been required of him as a member of that 
class. When satisfied with the apparent fitness of the candidate, 
the examining committee may, in spite of his deficiencies in some 
studies, admit him to an advanced class ; but a candidate so ad- 
mitted is not recommended for a degree until his deficiencies are 
made good. The examining committee may accept also, with 
proper restrictions, the official report of work satisfactorily com- 
pleted at a college or university of good standing in place of an 
examination upon such previous work. This arrangement is in- 
tended to obviate the necessity of long and minute examinations 
of the entire course, and to substitute, in place of examinations 
here, previous examinations passed satisfactorily at institutions of 
high standing. Every case is decided on its own merits ; and the 
candidate is assigned to that class for which he appears to be qual- 
fied. 

A candidate for advanced standing should present himself for 
examination on the same days and at the same hours with candi- 
dates for admission into the Freshman Class. 

III. Examinations for the Removal of Conditions. 

A student who has failed to pass the examinations in any college 
study may not take further work in that department until he 
make good his deficiency by a special examination or by taking 
the study a second time. 

An application for a special examination must be deposited in 
the office of the Registrar at least one week before special exami- 
nations begin. 

Examinations for the removal of conditions will be held in the 
respective lecture rooms of the instructors. 



ADlflSSTON OF OPTIONAL STUDENTS 67 

Order of Examinations. 

Monday, September 11. 
10. Physics. 2:30. Chemistry. 

Tuesday, September 12. 
10. Greek. 2:30. History. 

Wednesday, September 13. 
10. English'. 2:30. Biology. 

Thursday. September 14- 
10. German and French. 2:30. Mathematics. 

Friday. September 15. 
10. Latin. 2:30. Geology. 

Saturday, September 16. 
10. Philosophy. 2:30. Pedagogy. 

IV. Admission of Optional Students. 

A person who desires to take up an optional course of study, 
without becoming a candidate for a degree, may be admitted into 
the College without examination, upon the presentation of a cer- 
tificate from the college or university last attended, or by other- 
wise satisfying the Faculty that he is qualified to pursue the 
desired course. A candidate so admitted is called an optional 
student. He enjoys the same privileges with other members of 
the College, and is subject to the same regulations. 

Optional students are advised to elect work from one of the 
three shorter courses of study suggested on pages 52 and 53; but 
they may if properly qualified, pursue a special line of work in any 
department. 



68 THE COLLEGE 

REGISTRATION. 

All students are expected to present themselves for registration 
on Thursday, Friday or Saturday, September 14, 15 or 16, 1899, and 
Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, January 3, 4 or 5, 1900, between 
the hours of 9 A. M. and 4 P. M., at the office of the Registrar. 

A student who presents himself for registration after the dates 
and times named shall pay a fee of two dollars in addition to the 
regular fees. 

All students are further expected to present themselves for en- 
rollment at the first exercise in each of their several studies, re- 
quired and elective. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



FACULTY. 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L., President, and 
Professor ofrPolikical and Social Science. 

JOHN MANNING, LL.D., Professor of Common and Statute Law 
and Equity. 

KEMP PLUMMER BATTLE, LL.D.. Professor of Constitutional 
History and International Law. 

JAMES CRAWFORD BIGGS, Ph.B., Associate Professor of Com- 
mon and Statute Laic and Equity. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Law School provides two courses of study, each extending 
over a period of one college year. Instruction is given by means 
of text books, lectures, the study of leading cases, and moot courts. 
Special lectures are given by the resident instructors and by mem- 
bers of the bar on such subjects as have been greatly modified by 
our statutes or by the development of our civilization. The 
courses are as follows : — 

First Year. 

Associate Professor Biggs. 

1. Blackstone's Commentaries or Ewell's Essentials, Vol. I. 

Washburn or Williams on Real Property. Browne on the 
Domestic Relations. Heard on Pleading. Clark or 
Smith on Contracts. Clark on Corporations. Fishback's 
Elements of Law. Junior Class. 

Professor Manning. 

2. Bigelow or Pollock on Torts. Schouler on Executors. Mc- 



70 THE LAW SCHOOL 

Kelvey or First Greenleaf on Evidence. Adam's Equity- 

The Constitution of North Carolina and of the United 

States. The Code of North Carolina, particularly Clark's 

Code of Civil Procedure. Senior Class. 

The Supreme Court of North Carolina prescribes this course 
in the case of all applicants for license to practice law. 

Second Year. 

Professor Manning and Associate Professor BiGGS. 

3. Lawson on Bailments. Bigelow or Norton on Bills, Cheques 

and Notes. Dillon on Municipal Corporations. Darlington, 
Smith or Brantly on Personal Property. Browne, Benja- 
min or Burdick on Sales. May, Richards or Elliott on 
Insurance. Huffcutt on Agency. Russell on Crimes, or 
Wharton's or Clark's Criminal Law. 

Required of all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

Other Studies. 

Professor Battle. 

i 

4. Constitutional History and International Law. Two hours a 

week. 

Required of all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of 
Laws. 

« 
Professor Alderman. 

5. Political Economy and Social Science. l\vo hours <t week. 

Required of candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Thorough written examinations are held regularly throughout 
the year on the completion of each subject. A certificate is issued 
to those students who pass with credit on all subjects included in 
course 1. 



MOOT COURT 71 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS. 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws, (LL.B.,) is conferred by the 
University upon candidates who have completed courses, 1,2, 3, 
4 and 5, and have passed all examinations with credit. Two years 
of residence are ordinarily required of all students who desire to 
offer themselves as candidates for the degree. Every candidate 
must submit a thesis on some subject selected by the Senior Pro- 
fessor of Law. 

Applicants for the degree of Bachelor of Laws must be twenty • 
years of age, and must have completed an academic course equiva- 
lent to that of the Freshman and Sophomore years in the Col- 
lege. 

MOOT COURT. 

The moot court is an important factor in legal educational meth- 
ods : it familiarizes the student with the practical side of law. It 
is the purpose of the University court to acquaint the student with 
the legal details so necessary to be acquired yet so difficult of ac- 
cess. Regular sessions are held, and every student in the Law 
School has frequent opportunity for practice. The work is thor- 
ough and is carried on from the inception of the suit to the final 
judgment in the Appellate Court. The Court is held every Sat- 
urday night. 

Court of Appeals. 

Judge, Professor Manning. 

Superior Court. 

Judge, « Associate Professor Biggs. 
Associate, J. D. Parker. 

Clerk. R. B. Morrison. 

Sheriff, J. T. Poole. 



7l£ THfc LAW SCHOOL 

PECUNIARY AID. 

The Manning Prize. (Established in 1897.) A gold medal is 
offered to that candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Laws who 
shall submit the best thesis for that degree. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition in the Law School is one hundred dollars a 
year, one half payable at the beginning of each term, in Septem- 
ber and in January. Students who intend to apply for the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, or to remain in the class two years can do 
so by paying, in advance, one hundred and fifty dollars. Students 
whose names are sent in to the President by the senior professor 
of law may take the course prescribed by the Supreme Court for 
applicants for license in one term, upon payment of a fee of $75.00. 
Those students taking two terms and paying $100.00, and those stu- 
dents taking one term and paying $75.00 may remain over during 
the months of January or September after the close of the term or 
terms without re-registration. 

Students at the summer session taking the Junior and Senior 
Classes are entitled to the same privilege. A student in the Law 
Sehool has no other fee to pay unless he occupies a University 
room. For assignment of rooms, and for board, see page 62. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Law School should present 
themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candi- 
dates lor admission into the College, either in September or Janu- 
ary. Candidates for admission and students already members of 
the school are expected to register according to the regulations 
on page 68. The session of the Law School is of the same length 
with the college year. 

All members of the Law School enjoy the same privileges with 
other students in the University. 



THE 8UMMEH LAW SCHOOL 73 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 

During the summer two classes in law are conducted by Profes- 
sors Manning and Biggs. The text books used are the same 
with those required in course 1, prescribed by the Supreme Court. 

The summer session begins on the first day of July and ends on 
the Friday before the last Monday in September. 

The fee for admission into either class is thirty dollars for tui- 
tion, and three dollars for registration : for admission into both 
classes, sixty dollars for tuition, and three dollars for registration. 
All fees are payable in advance. 



THE MEDICAL SCHOOL. 



FACULTY. 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L.. President. 

RICHARD HENRY WHITEHEAD, A.B., M.D., Professor of An- 
atomy and Pathology. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B.. M.D., Professm of Physi- 
ology and Materia Medica. 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Professor of Physics. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D.. Professor of. Biology. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The Medical School provides two courses of study, for which arc 
claimed the advantages derived from good equipment and small 
classes. Each student has the opportunity of seeing th'e various 
demonstrations and experiments, and receives direct personal in- 
struction. 

Course A. 

This course extends over a period of one college year, and is in- 
tended for students who cannot devote four years to medical edu- 
cation After completing it, students are admitted to the second 
year of colleges having a three years course. In course A the fol- 
lowing subjects are studied: Physics. Chemistry, Histology. An- 
atomy, Physiology and Materia Medica. 

Course B. 
This course extends over a period of two college years, and is 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION <0 

intended for those who can give four years to medical education. 
Its successful completion will admit a student to the third year of 
high grade colleges. In the first year the following subjects are 
studied: Physics. General Chemistry, General Biology, Histol- 
ogy and Anatomy : in the second year. Medical Chemistry, Em- 
bryology, Anatomy. Minor Surgery, Physiology. Materia Medica 
and Pathology, including Bacteriology. 

Physics. 

Professor Gore. 

1. Elementary course. The fundamental facts of physics pre- 
sented, and the general laws illustrated by experiments. 

Chemistry. 

Professor Vexable. 

1. General Descriptive Chemistry. 

The elements are taken up in their order and described, and 
this study is followed by the laws of combination and 
the compounds formed. The latter part of the course is 
taken up with organic chemistry. 

Associate Professor Baskerville. f 

2. Qualitative Analysis. Fall term. 

The student is made to perform all the usual tests for the or- 
dinary elements and compounds, so as to become familiar, 
with them and be able to analyze qualitatively the ordi- 
nary substances met with. 

3. Toxicology and Urinary Analysis. Spring term. 

The nature and action of co nmon poisons are studied and 
practice is given in the tests for them. The latter part of 
the course consists of qualitative and, in part, quantitative 
analysis of the urine followed by the microscopic examina- 
tions of urinary sediments. 

Biology. 

In the biological courses some record of each day's work is kept 
by the student. This record consists chiefly of sketches made di- 
rectly from the dissection or the preparations under the micro- 



76 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

scope. The importance of making a figure (even a poor one) of the 
object under study, cannot be overestimated as an aid to observa- 
tion. In addition to the usual written examinations, practical ex- 
aminations on the work done in the laboratory are held. 

Professor Wilson. 

1. General Biology. 

Representative types of the great groups of animals are 
dissected and studied microscopically. The forms range 
on the one side from the unicellular animals to the verte- 
brates, and on the other from the unicellular plants to the 
flowering plants. The structure of the cell and the 
nucleus, and the changes of the latter during division are 
-included in this course. In the lectures the forms to be 
studied are briefly described, their relations are pointed 
out, and the principles which they illustrate are explained. 
The fundamental facts concerning living things are thus 
learned directly from nature in such a way as to develop 
the power of accurate observation, skill in handling in- 
struments, and method in the recording of notes. 

2. Vertebrate Histology. 

The principle tissues and organs of the vertebrate body 
are here studied by the refined methods of modern mi- 
croscopy. Whenever profitable, the living tissue is first 
examined. Both paraffin and celloidin sections ai'e em- 
ployed, the staining and mounting being done by each 
member of the class. 

3. Vertebrate Embryology. 

The main facts in the development of a vertebrate animal 
are here worked out by the student for himself with the 
aid of explanatory lectures. A. brief survey of the early 
stages of development, including fertilization, segmenta- 
tion, and the formation of the germ layers is first made, 
after which the origin and development of the typical Ver- 
tebrate organs is followed out in some detail in chick em- 
bryos. In addition the foetal membranes of some mam- 
malian embryo are examined. The embedding, section- 
cutting, staining, mounting are all done by the student, 
so that in this and the preceding section a useful knowl- 
edge of microscopic technique is acquired. 



Anatomy. 

Professor WHITEHEAD. 

First Year. 
1. Anatomy. 

During the first year the study of this subject proceeds by 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 77 

systems, first the bones, then the muscles, etc. The stu- 
dent does most of the dissection for himself under the close 
supervision of the instructor ; the most difficult dissections 
are made for him. Daily demonstrations and examina- 
tions on the skeleton or cadaver are held, and numerous 
practical examinations are required. The aim of the in- 
structor always is to induce the student to go directly to 
nature for his facts, and to acquire familiarity with them 
by constantly seeing- and handling- them, thus obtaining 
knowledge which will be useful and abiding. 

Second Year. 

2. Anatomy. 

During the second year, the student does all the dissecting, 
and studies the body by regions rather than by systems. 
and is quizzed daily on the parts he dissects. Thus the 
student is made to investigate, see. and verify for himself 
the truths of anatomy as they exist in nature and not in 
diagrams and pictures. 

Physiology, Materia Medica, and Surgery. 

Professor Mangum. 

1. Physiology. 

The system of teaching is by text-book, lectures, and quiz- 
zes. Special attention is given to the nervous and diges- 
tive systems, and the practical bearings of physiological 
facts are pointed out. 

2. Materia Medica. 

This embraces the study of the geographical and botanical 
sources of drugs, the physiological and toxic effects of rem- 
edies. The indications for their use are briefly ex- 
plained. 

3. Minor Surgery. 

Under this head instruction is given in the application of 
bandages, and of splints, and in the modern methods of 
dressing wounds. 

Pathology. 

Professor Whitehead. 
1. Bacteriology. 

The student learns by practical experience the methods of 
cultivating, staining and identifying the principal bacteria, 
and their pathological significance is explained by lect- 



78 THE MEDICAL SCHOOL 

ures and demonstrated by inoculation of animals. In this 
way the chief pathogenic bacteria ai-e studied in pure cul- 
ture on the various media, after which the methods of ob- 
taining- pure culture from mixtures of bacteria are learned. 
The necessary manipulations are carried out by the stu- 
dents, who thus obtain a practical knowledge of the sub- 
ject which can be gained in no other way. 

2. Bacteriology. A short course in the methods of examining 

normal and pathological blood. 

3. Pathological Histology. 

In this course the various changes which may be produced in 
the tissues as a result of disease ere discussed in lectures 
and studied by means of the microscope. The laboratory 
is especially well provided with pathological material. 
Thus during the last session each student stained, mounted, 

' and studied over one hundred sections extending over 
almost the whole range of pathology. The sections be- 
come the property of the student, and are of much use 
afterwards. The laboratory contains a library of standard 
works. 

PECUNIARY AID. 

The Harris Prize. (Established in 1895.) Mrs. T. W. Har- 
ris offers, in honor of the late Dr. T. W. Harris, a pocket case of 
instruments to that student who shall make the best grade in 
Anatomy. 

The Wood Scholarship. (Established in 1892.) Mrs. Mary 
Sprunt Wood, of Wilmington, has founded, in memory of her late 
husband, Dr. Thomas Panning Wood, a scholarship of the value 
of ninety dollars. 

EXPENSES. 

C The fee for tuition in the Medical School is ninety dollars a year, 
one half payable at the beginning of each term, in September and 
in January. Small laboratory i'ees are required in Histology, Bi- 
ology, Medical Chemistry and Embryology. A student in the 
Medical School has no other fee to pay unless he occupy a Univer- 
sity room. For assignment of rooms and for board, see page 62. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 79 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the Medical School should present 
themselves on the same days and at the same hours with candidates 
for admission into the College. Candidates for admission and 
students already members of the school are expected to register 
according to the regulations on page 68. The session of the Med- 
ical School is of the same length with the college year. 

All members of the Medical School enjoy the same privileges 
with other students in the University. 



THE SCHOOL OF PHAEMACY. 



FACULTY. 

EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L., PRESIDENT. 

EDWARD VERNON HOWELL, A.B., Ph.G., Professor of Phar- 
macy- 

FRANCIS PRESTON VENABLE, Ph.D., Professor of Chemis- 
try. ■ 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, O.E., Professor of Physics. 

HENRY van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D.. Professor of Biology. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM. A.B., M.D., Professor of Mate- 
ria Medica. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Prof essor of Chem- 
istry. 

THOMAS WILLIAMS KENDRICK. Assistant in the Pharmaceu- 
tical Laboratory. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The School of Pharmacy offers instruction extending over a pe- 
riod of two college years. The courses are as follows : — 

First Year. 

Pharmaceutics. 

Professor Howell. 

1. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. Five hours a week. 

2. Practical Course in Operative Pharmacy. Two hours once a 

week. 

Physics. 

Professor Gore. 
1. Elementary Physics. Two hours a week. 



COUBSES OF ESSTBCCTION 81 

Chemistry. 

Professor Vexable. 
1. Experimental Chemistry. Lectures, with laboratory work. 
Three hour* a week. 

Biology. 
Professor Wilsox. 
i. Elements of Physiology. Lectures, with laboratory work. 
Three hours a' week (full term]. 

Pharmaceutical Botany. 

Professor Howell. 
1. Pharmaceutical Botany. Two hours a week [spring term). 

Quizzes. 

Professor Howell. 
1. Specimen Quizzes. One hour a week. 

Second Year. 

Pharmaceutics. 

Professor HOWELL. 

1. Theory and Practice of Pharmacy. Five hours a week. 

2. Practical Course in Operative Pharmacy. Two hours once a 

week. 

Chemistry. 

Associate Professor Baskerville. 

1. Analytical Chemistry. Toxicology and Urinary Analysis. Two 
hours o week. 

Biology. 

Professor WILSON. 
1, General Biology. Lectures, with laboratory work. Three 
hours a week. 



oZ THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

* 

Materia Medica. 

Professor Howell. 

1. Materia Medica. Three hours a week (fall term). 

Professor MANGUM. 

2. Materia Medica. Five hour* <i week [spring term). 

LABORATORIES. 

A description of the physical, chemical, and biological labor- 
atories will be found elsewhere in the catalogue. A special labor- 
atory is placed at the service of the students in Pharmacy. This 
is fitted up with desks, tables, gas, water, and such apparatus and 
materials as are necessary for the prosecution of their work. . 

The department, also, has a special Library and Reading-room, 
well supplied with the leading periodicals and standard works on 
Pharmacy. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition in the School of Pharmacy is seventy-five 
dollars a year, one half payable at the beginning of each term, in 
September and in January. There is a charge of five dollars a 
term for registration in addition to the fee for tuition. A student 
in the School of Pharmacy has no other fee to pay unless he occu- 
py a University room. For assignment of rooms, and for board 
see page 62. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

Candidates for admission into the School of Pharmacy should 
present themselves on the same days and at the same hours with 
candidates for admission into the College. Candidates for admis- 
sion and students already members of the school are expected to 
register according to the regulations on page 68. The session of 
the School of Pharmacy is the same length with the college year. 

All members of the School of Pharmacy enjoy the same privi- 
leges with other students in the University. 



STUDENTS (1898-99). 



Graduates. 



Name. Year. Residence. 

I Ahern, Katharine Cecilia, First, Hartford, Conn. 

A. B., (Smith College) 1898. German, Latin, Pedagogy. 

Canada, John William. Second, Chapel Hill. 

A. B., 1896. English, Greek, German. 

Currie, Daniel Johnson, Second, Chapel Hill. 

A. M., 1897. English. Greek, Pedagogy. 
Currie, William Pinkney xMartin, First, Raeford. 

A. B., 1894. Greek, Pedagogy, Philosophy. Non Resident 

Gregory, Edwin Clark, Third, Halifax. 

A. B., 1896. English, Latin, History. 

Henderson, Archibald, First, Chapel Hill. 

A. B.. 1898. Instructor in Mathematics. Mathematics, French, Latin. 

Horney, William Johnston, Second, Greensboro. 

A. B., 1897. English, Latin, Greek. 

Howell, Edward Vernon, Second, Chapel Hill. 

A. B., (Wake Forest College) 1892. Ph. G.. (Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy) 1894. Professor of Pharmacy. Chemistry, Botany, Min- 
eralogy. 

%. Kendrick, Mary Pearson, First, Boston, Mass. 

A. B., (Smith College) 1898. Greek, Latin, Pedagogy. 

May, Samuel, Second, Chapel Hill. 

A. "B., (Harvard) 1896. Instructor in Modern Languages. French, Ger- 
man, English. 

Slade, William Bonner, Second, Columbus, Ga. 

A. B., 1880. Latin, French, Political Science. Non Resident. 

Webb, John Frederick, First, Crisp. 

A. B., 1898. Greek, Latin, German. Non Resident. 

Whitener, Robert Vance, Second, Hickory. 

A. B., 1897. English, Latin. Non Resident. 

Wilson, Nathan Hunt Daniel, Second, Chapel Hill. 

A. B., 1886. B. D., (Vanderbilt University) 1890. Greek, English, Phil- 
osophy. 

14 



84 



STUDENTS 



Senior Class. 



link 



Name. 
Alstonr-Charles Skinner, 
Askew. Edwajd Step henson. 

BowieTTtromas Contee, 

Broadhurst. Edgar David, 
sj jrown, Charles Con nor. 

Bunn, -- J ames Philips. 
-BtTxton.'n afllt ji'ui i Br io, 
(-©SKTweii, JullUS" Alexander, Jr. 
"^^Canada, Charles Stafford , 

Can-, John Robert. 

Garr, Julian Shakespeare, Jr.. 
. CV)k q rr F un i win W illia.rn. 

Connor, Robert Diggs Wimberly, Philosophy 

^^, ^Tinig-TT! fV1wg.i-r|, 

.Coxe, Frei LJaekson. 

"Davis, Harvey Lewis, 
'Davis, Rober t -ereeB^-Slngleton. Arts, 
Di muj o U ) Ula raffe Baker, Jr., 
Donnelly-,- Job n, 

D uugherfry " , B tefri'ord Barnard, S.B., 
(Carson and Newman) 1896, 



Do zicr, J agsa-Knight, 
Gr©&»fi6M7-J©iwi.Mabry, Jr. 

{Guilford College) 1898, 
"GHtnesT-Jimius Daniel, : 
Hard ing, Hen ry Patrick, 
Harris, Charles Foust, 
Htw^ley-r-Eugene-F-uller, 
_Bewfb1r, -Joseph-Henry, 
Jiolmesy-Howard Braxton, 



A.B 



Course. 


Residence. 


Arts, 


Littleton, 


Arts, 


Windsor. 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


Philosophy, 


Obids. 


Philosophy. 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


Cottonwood. 


Science, 


Rocky Mount. 


Arts, 


Winston. 


Science, 


Salisbury. 


Philosophy, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Durham. 


Arts, 


Durham. 


Arts, 


Darlington, S. G, 


Philosophy, 


Wilson. 


Arts. 


Coxville. 


Arts, 


Lilesville. 


Arts, 


Graham. 


Arts, 


Teer. -*T, , 
High Point. 


Science, 


Arts, 


Henderson. 


Arts, 


Raleigh . 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


.B. , 

Philosophy, 


Boone. 


Arts, 


Conetoe. 


Arts, 


Kernersville. 


Arts, 


Grimesland. 


Arts, 


Greenville. 


Philosophy, 


Falkland. 


Philosophy. 


Tyro Shops. 


Arts, 


Mapleton, Va. 


Arts, 


Franklinton. 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 



85 



HtHBer^Ttromas, Jr., 
JonS&r^^rgri Laurens, A.B.. 

{Carson and Newman) 1897. 
Kittreiir-Rebert GrHiam, 
Kluttz, Warren Lawson, Jr., 
LanjLcJSflKaisd. Mayo, 
'/> Laee, Benjamin Benson. Jr., 
tU Latter? JaTnT*3~Edward. 
^Lockett, Everett Augustine. 
aLontfain, Rrmry Vf-in-vr 
McFadyen, John McLauchlin, 
Miller, Alexander Clinton. 
Osborne, Francis Moore, 
Patte*3M^H~Edniuiid Vogler, 
Pe ai ' oom ■■ Thtftaaas Gilbert, B.S., 

(Guilford College) 1897. 
R. eaves. SamuelAVatson, 
Ross, John Kirkland, 
Sittersoh-,- Jas£pli=Murden, Jr., 
"bStaley, Bessie, A. B., 
College) 1898, 
"Vlc'O&eoi'ge-Davis, 
Wag-staffi- Hcnry M cGilbe r t . 
Watson, Harry Legare, 
WilscmTLTTtris-Sound , 
Wilson. Willkt»H9-Sidney. 
Winstohy T Rube r fr «Alonza, 
Wood, Edward Jenner, 
Woodson, Ernest Horatio. 



Arts. 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Mayflower, Tenn 


Philosophy, 


Kittrell. 


Arts. 


Salisbury. 


A rts, ' 


Littleton. 


Arts. 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy. 


Durham. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Arts, 


Pittsboro. 


Arts. 


Raeford. 


Science, 


Winston. 


Arts. 


Charlotte. 


Science, 


Salem. 


Science, 


Archer, Fla. 


Science. 


Temperance, 


Arts. 


Charlotte. [S. C 


Arts. 


William ston. 


Arts, 


Franklinton. 


Arts, 


Selma. 


Philosophy, 


Olive Hill. 


A rts. 


Phoenix, S. C. 


Arts, 


Lenoir. 


Philosophy. 


Gatewood. 


Arts, 


Franklinton. 


Science, 


Wilmington. 


Arts, 


Salisbury. " _ 



Junior Class. 



Adams, Stonewall Jackson, Arts, 

Allison, Thomas Tillett. Arts, 



Raleigh. 
Charlotte, 



8(3 



Anderson, Halcott, 
Anderson, Thomas Jackson, 
Asbury, Joseph Jennings, 
Barwick, AitenTTonnson, 
Bennett, Frank, Jr., 
Berk-ek^jtr-Alfred Rives, 
Bernard, William Stanley, 
Bitting, Alexander Thomas. 
Boyd, Robert Waynesville, 
Bxanch^Loiirtrr^m-^oy, 
Bryan, William Frank, 
Byerly, Thomas Jefferson, 
Ca tes, Al onzo Enoch, 
Chadbourn, George, 
Cheatham, Thaddeus Ainsley, 
GotfeyrfrE Torgo Nel son, 
Collins, Henry Whitaker, 

-CWtey, Henry Clay, Jr., 
Curtis, Nathaniel Cortland t, 
Curtis, Walter Clarence, 
Gant, Joseph Erwin, 
Graves, Ernest, 
Greening, John Wesley, 
Harris, Isaac Foust, 
Hearn, Williamson Edward, 
Hinsdale, John Wetmore, Jr 
Hoell, Charles Franklin, 
Hollowell, Frank Whiteley, 
Hopper, Allen Taylor, 
Jones, Thaddeus Winfield, Jr., 
Latham, Marcia Louise 
Lewis, Kemp Plummer, 
Lockhart, James Alexander. Ji 

""Lynch, James Madison, 
-Masssy; James Buckner 
Miller, Claude Lee. 



STUDENTS 




Arts, 


Pensacola, Fla. 


Philosophy, 


Calahan. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Philosophy, 


Grifton. 


Philosophy, 


Wadesboro. 


Arts, 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Arts, 


Greenville. 


, Science, 


Winston. 


Science, 


Waynesville. -J 


Science, 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 


.Philosophy. 


Goldsboro. 


Philosophy. 


Yadkin College. 


Philosophy, 


Swepsonville. 


Arts, 


Wilmington. 


iy, Arts, 


Henderson. 


Arts, 


Patterson. 


Philosophy, 


Enfield. 


Arts, 


States ville. 


Philosophy, 


Southport. 


Philosophy, 


Southport. 


Philosophy, 


Burlington. 


Arts, 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Harrellsville. 


Philosophy, 


Chapel Hill. 


Science, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy, 


Raleigh. 


Arts, 


Aurora. 


Philosophy, 


Elizabeth City. 


Philosophy, 


Leaksville. 


v., Science, 


Acton. 


Philosophy, 


Plymouth. ""V, 


Arts, 


Raleigh. -j 


. Jr.. Arts, 


Wadesboro. 


Science, 


Fairview. 


Arts, 


Fort Mill, gTB!* 


Philosophy, 


Shelby. 



THE SOPHOMORE CLASS 




Jktoece^Jahn Augustus, Philosophy. Littletou. 

Neville. Ernest Long, Philosophy, Chapel Hill. 

P-irhrr T>i*vir1 Prpjtnn Arts, Benson. 

Pickard, Marvin Alfred. Science. Chapel Hill. 

Reynolds. Henry Harry. Philosophy, Winston. 

Ric OvTh o ma s-Donnelly. Philosophy. Sydney, Fla. 

:-tes-e- r Cha rles Grandison, Arts, Fayetteville. 

Taylor-William Franklin. Science, Norfolk, Va. 

Thompson. Charles Everett. Philosophy, Elizabeth City. 

Ward. Need ham Frastus. Philosophy. Wilson. 

Wa*kriisr"Fonso Butler. Philosophy. Rutherford ton. 

Wnartoirp-William Gilmer. Philosophy. Greensboro. 

Wilson. :Hgjjry Evan Davis. Philosophy. Chapel Hill. 

Woodardv-Gxaham. Letter*. Wilson. 

Woedson. Charles Whitehead. Arts. Salisbury. 

53 



Sophomore Class. 



A4e* an d ei . E benezer. 
AjS eaat. ■ Jooop h Emmery, 
Bateman. Herbert Dalton, 
Battle. William Kemp. 
Bell. Beirjamin. .Jr.. 
Be»»et.fc. Hugh Hammond, 
Brim*. Rosser Emmett, 
Bjswrk^-Baird Urquhart, 
Brooks. Bernard Alexander, 
Bryant, Pegram Ardrey, 

/ml'obb-rPalmer. 
Qjj2^ , »blSFC»rtH4ie Paul. 

Conley,- Tames Robert. 
Cow pety^feor ge Vernon. 
Craven. Willie Wilhelm. 
Dani&lr-Ze-bulon Va»ce. 
6 



Arts, 


Chapel Hill, 


Arts. 


Raleigh. 


Philosophy. 


Plymouth. 


Science. 


Raleigh. 


Science, 


\Yilmington. 


Science. 


Wadesboro. 


Philosophy, 


Hertford. 


Science. 


Nashville. 


Science. 


Nashville. 


Philosophy, 


Pineville. 


Arts. 


Raleigh. 


Science. 


Danville. Va. 


A rts. 


Gilmer's Store 


Philosophy, 


Lenoir. 


Science. 


Winton. 


Arts. 


Bristow. 


Philosophy, 


Bringles. 



88 



STUDENTS 







Da~v4 s, Royal Oscar Eugene, 

Dees, DanieLAlionso, 
Eskridge, Robert Lee, 
Gibson, William Henry, 
Graham, Archibald Wright, 
Graham, David Sloan, 
Gray. Eugene Price. 
Gudger. Emmet Carlyle, 
Hall, James King. 
Hand, Hubert Walton, 
Hardin i Aii'lihni "Wrn 11i , 
Harrington, Wilton Daniel, 

'H obbo, Jriliuc C harles, Jr., 
Jarratt, Augustus Henry, 
Jenkins. Hubert Franklin, 
McCanless, Walter Frederick. 
McFadyen, Henry Richard, 
Mcintosh, Milton, 
Mclver, Claude Robertson, 
MacRae, Cameron. 
lYLnlrfflly, M " f -ili, T~ , 
Margin. "Jos mih B onaparte , 
Mizell, William Henderson, 
Murphy. William Alexander. 
Muri'ay, Hugh Hargrave, 
Nral, I'Moyandur Weldon, 
Nc wby . -GertrM Bruce, 



Patterson, Lemuel Bruce, 
Philips, Joseph Battle, Jr., 
Plummer, John Franklin, 
Porter, Robert Edwin, 
Post, James Francis, Jr., Jr., 
Pritchard, William Douglas. 
Riddick, Willard James, 



Philosophy, 

Philosophy, 

Science, 

Philosophy, 

Science, 

Arts, 

Philosophy, 

Arts, 

Arts, 

Arts, 

Science, 

Philosophy, 

Arts, 

Philosophy. 

Philosophy. 

Science, 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy, 

Arts, 

Arts, 

Philosophy. 

Philosophy. 

Arts, 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy. 

Arts, 

Philosophy. 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy, 

Science, 

Philosophy. 

Science, 

Philosophy, 

Science. 

Philosophy, 

Science. 



Chester, S. C. 
St. Pauls. 
Grantsboro. 
Shelby. 
Concord. 
Charlotte. 
Charlotte. 
Winston. 
Asheville. 
Dunlap. 
Belmont. 
Sutherland. 
Jesup. 

Elizabeth City. 
Hobton. 
Mana. 
A yd en . 
Trinity. 
Clarkton . 
Laurinburg. 
Greensboro. 
Chapel Hill. 
Edenton. 
Chapel Hill. 
Jamesville. 
Morgan ton. 
Wilson. 

Scotland Neck- 
Hertford. 
Troutman. 
Battleboro. 
Archdale. 
Greensboro. 
Wilmington. 
Marshall. 
Gatesvilie. 



THE FKESHMAN CLASS 



Rogers Shxilier Justin. Philosophy, Deerfield. 

Root, Aldert Smedes, Philosophy, Raleigh. 

Satterfield, Robert Samuel. Science, Mt. Airy. 

miw uui' i B enjamin Smith, Philosophy, Hertford. 

Stevens, George Phifer. Arts, Waxhavv. 

Stevens, Luke Leary. Philosophy, Shiloh. 

Swain, Thomas Lee, Philosophy, Bay. 

Swink, David Maxwell. Science, Winston. 

Tarrtr ^Srastoh Isaiah, Arts, BlackmansMills. 

Taylor, Edmund Brodie, Arts, Townesville. 

Thigpen, Kenneth Bayard, Arts, Conetoe. 

'huaipson.-Dorinan Steele, Philosophy. Statesville. 

Turrentine, John William. Philosophy, Burlington. 

Weil, Herman, Science, Goldsboro. 

Whitehead, William Bynum, Science, Wilson. 

Willis, Emniett Olive, Philosophy. German ton. 

Woltz,, Albeit Edgar, Science, Dobson. 

TO 



Freshman Class. 



Alexander Emory Graham, 
Alexander, John Howard, 
A14i*»#»r James dimming, 
At watov , Carney Bynum. 
Ballard. David Clark. 
Earnhardt, Harold Morton. 
Bhi«. William Alexander. 
Brem, Tod Robinson, 

ooks^Julius Caesar. 
^CaxP ? Alb ert Marvin, 
Chatnberlain, Claude Spencer, 
Champion. -John Dixon. 
Cheshire, Joseph Blount, Jr., 
C oMv Ed ward Barham, 
( Vn ^ey, Ra lph Perkins, 



Science, 


Charlotte. 


Arts. 


Chapel Hill. 


Arts, 


Charlotte. 


Philosophy, 


Chapel Hill. 


Philosophy. 


Louisburg. 


Arts, 


Pioneer Mills. 


Science, 


Aberdeen. 


Ph Hosophy, 


Charlotte. 


Science, 


Marsh ville. • 


Science, 


Durham. 


Philosophy, 


Goldsboro. 


Arts, 


Chalk Level. 


Arts, 


Raleigh. 


Philosophy, 


Wilson. 


Philosophy, 


Lenoir. 



90 



STUDENTS 



Cook, James Sion, Arts, Stokesdale. 

Crews, William Edward, Science-, Germanton. 

Deaton, Romulus Stevenson, Arts, Mooresville. 

Dowd, Orrin Wesley, Arts, Carbonton. 

. — / — ^Duncan, Julius Fletcher, Arts, Beaufort. 

^^M^^rin^haus. John C. B., Arts, Elizabeth City. 

Elliott, Madison Lee, Philosophy, Cuba. 

Everett, Simon Justus, Philosophy, Palmyra. 

Everett, Reuben Oscar, Philosophy, Palmyra. 

Exum, Josiah Call, Science, Snow Hill. 

Fetter, Samuel Prichard. Philosophy,. Wadesboro, _ 

Ford, Edward Stegall, Philosophy, Louisburg. 

Foust, Thomas Bledsoe, Philosophy, Winston. 

Fowle. Daniel Gould, Philosophy, Raleigh. 

Gibson, John Shaw, Philosophy, Adamsville.S. C. 

Gibson^ Richard Puryear. Philosophy, Concord. 

Godwin, Robert Linn, Arts, Dunn. 

., Goodman, Fimivi, Philosophy, Wilmington. 

Gregory, Quentin, Arts, Halifax. 

Gulley, Edwin Kerr, Science, Goldsboro. 

Hadley. Wade Hampton, Philosophy, Siler City. 

a Harris, Frederick Henry, Arts, Chapel Hill. 

m Henderson, John Steele, Jr., Arts, Salisbury. 

"^^^"Highsmith, Chancy, Philosophy. Maitland. 

Hogan, Percy Vann, Arts, Chapel Hill. 

Hoover, Aubrey Ramseur, Philosophy, Concord 

Humphrey, Clen Simmons, Philosophy. Goldsboro. 

Hutchison, Robert Stuart, Philosophy. Charlotte. 

Jrtcnck'f Wl 1 i- 1vn Picard, Arts, Windsor, 

Johnson, Preston Bright, Philosophy. Gift. 

Johnson, William Theophilus, Arts, Concord. 

KefluTft: (iruu - te D olby. Science, Shiloh. 

Kennedy, (laude Melville. Science, Goldsboro. 

Kerley, Aionzo Commodore. Arts, Morganton. 

Kerr, Easley Graves. Philosophy. Vanceyville. 

Kluttz. Whitehead, Philosophy, Salisbury. 




THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



91 



A 



% 



Koraegay, Henry Arthur. 
Lambeth, Harvey Allen. 
Lewis, Ivey Foreman. 
Lichtenthaeler. Robert Arthur 
Mclver, James Harry, 
Maddry, Charles Edward. 
Means. Gaston Bullock. 
Merritt, Robert Amsei. 
Miller. John Preston. 
Mitchell, Louis Philip. 
Nash. Joseph Cheshire, 
Nissen. Fred Irvin. 
OUiar^Thomas Clifford. 
O wofi. W alter Benton. 
P ahnoiv - Charles Christian. 
Peirce. -Wentwortb Willis. 
Pfio*>JWarren Stebbins. Jr., 
Reynolds. George Lee. 
Reynolds. Joseph Roscoe. 



hL R©bins_Henry Moring, 
Sallenger. Edward Duncan. 
Smith. James Thomas. 
Staffed. William Faris. 
8feeptr5irsT"Kemp Battle. 
Sigga,- David Pony. 
Steven s. Har ry Pelham. 
'Stevenson. Rest on, 
Strickland. George Burder. 
Sutton, William Wallace. 
Swain. John-Ed-w«rd. 
Stroud. Thomas Moody. 
Thompson. Oran Stedman. 
Vann, Aldridge Henley. 
WalkerrN^rthan Wilson. 
Webb, John Stanford, 
Whitaker, Vernon Edelen, 



Philosophy, 

Science, 

Arts, 

Science. 

Philosophy. 

Philosophy, 

Ph Uosophy, 

Arts. 

Science. 

Arts, 

Philosophy. 

Science, 

Science. 

Philosophy, 

Arts. 

Arts, 

Ph Uosophy, 

Philosophy. 

Arts. 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy, 

A rts. 

Arts. 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy. 

Arts. 

Philosophy, 

Science. 

Philosophy. 

Philosophy, 

Philosophy. 

Science. 

Arts. 

Science. 

Science, 




Kenansville. 

Fayetteville. 

Raleigh. 

Salem. 

Greensboro. 

Chapel Hill. 

Concord. 

Chapel Hill. 

Winston. 

Franklinton. 

Tarboro. 

Salem. 

Charlotte. 

Liberty. 

Gulf. 

Warsaw. 

Fayetteville. 

Queen. 

Ora. 

Asheboro. 

Sans Souci. 

Pineville. 

Burlington. 

Chapel Hill. 

Scotland Neck. 

Goldsboro. 

Wilmington. 

Smithfield. 

Fayetteville. 

Democrat. 

Sanford. 

Raleigh .^^^^ 

Franklinton. 

Poplar Branch. 

Bell Buckle, 

Raleigh. [Tenn. 



92 

Whitaker, Spier, 

Willcox. Jesse W'omble, 
Williams, Buxton Barker, 
Williamsv-Robert Ransom. 
-Wood, John Hunter, 
Woodward, William Sadoc, 
Worth, Thomas Clark son, 



STUDENTS 




Arts, 


Davenport, Iowa 


Arts, 


Carbonton. 


Philosophy, 


Putnam. 


Arts, 


Ridge way. 


Arts, 


Newton. 


Science, 


Wilmington. 


Science, 


Raleigh. 


Science, 


Asheboro. 




95 



Optional Students. 



y 



Name. 
Abernethy, Claude Oliver, 
Adams, Thaddeus Awasaw, 
Ahern, Angela Beatrice. 
Atkinson, Jasper Sidney, 
Basnight, Thomas Gray, 
Blackman, Neill Robert, 
Bridger, John, 
Brown, Earl Henderson, 
Brown, Jennings Caney, 
Burgess, James Lafayette, 
Burns, Clarence May, 
Calder, James William, 
Cannon, Claudius Lillington, 
Carr, George Augustus, 
Chastain, Rufus Benjamin, 
Clark, Montague Graham, 
Cleveland, Frederick L., 
Copeland, James Watts, Jr., 
Cowper, Bayard Thurman, 
Crawley. Charles Peyton, 
Crawley, Hanna F., 
Cromer, Clarence Franklin. 
Dortch, James Tyson, 
Drake, Otis Branch, 



Year. 


Residence. 


Second, 


Enfield. 


First, 


Finch. 


First, 


Hartford, Conn. 


Second, 


Siloam. 


First, 


Scuppernong. 


Second, 


Jesup. 


Second, 


Mapleton. 


First, 


Concord. 


First, 


Asheville. 


First, 


Liberty. 


Second, 


Wadesboro. 


First, 


Charlotte. 


First, 


Ayden. 


Second, 


Durham. 


First, 


Brasstown. 


Second, 


Sandifer. 


Second, 


Chapel Hill. 


Second, 


Statesville. 


Second, 


Gatesville. 


Second, 


Morgan ton. 


First, 


Adriance, Va. 


First, 


Winston. 


Second, 


Goldsboro. [D. C. 


First. 


Washington, 



OPTIONAL STUDENTS 



93 






Dula, Alfred Wimer, First, Old Fort. 

Edwards. Albert Dollie, Second, Winston. 

Everhart. Lawrence Anthony. Second, Arnold. 

Glenn, Chalmers Lanier. Second, Winston, 

Gullett, Benjamin David. First, Tampa. Fla. 

Harkins. Thomas Joshua, Jr., Second, Asheville. 

Hill. Ethelbert Lucius. First, Beaufort. 

Hiiiyhavv, Ge©*ige Miller, First, Winston. 

Holmes, Andrew Allgood. First, Atlanta, Ga. 

Huhn, John Edward. Second, Wilmington. 

Hunter. Will. Jr.. First, Kinston. 

Ivie^A-Ben Denny. First. Leaksville. 

Johnson, Luren Thomas. Second, Ingold. 

.. Jones, Alice Edwards, First, Goldsboro. 

Joyner. Edmund Noah, Jr., First, Columbia. S. C. 

Kerner, Charlie Caleb. Second, Kernersville. 

Lynch, James Simpson, First, Cuba. 

Lyon. Homer LeGrande. Second. Elizabethtown. 

MeEachern. Robert Alexander. Third. Lumber Bridge. 

MeGehee, John William. ' First. Madison. 

Mclver, Evan Gordon. First, Gulf. 

McLamb, Joel Robert, Second. Orange. 

McLean. Alexander Pureell, Second, Laurinburg. 

McNider, William De Berniere, Second. Chapel Hill. 

Matheson, Percy Beverley. First. Wadesboro. 

Miller. Frank Wharton, Fifth, Winston. 

Monroe, Stansbury Martain. First, Fayetteville. 

Moses, Susan Williams. First, Raleigh. 

Nichols, James Thomas. First, Barnard. 

Ottinger, Charles Albert, Second, Asheville. 

"l *OPter - . Nathan Anderson. First. Tarboro. 

ReywrMy. AbraurBavid/ Jr.. Second. Bristol, Tenn. 

R^yiroldsTJTThn.-- Second, Asheville. 

-Rid^ick: William -Mtl'ls, Second. Gatesville. 

Rk iibuii. Fi ' tmk ' C layton. Second, Winston. 

St Clair, Donald Lawrence, Second. Sanford. 



-.jxj^ury^ 



«p. 



94 

'Sadler,- Frank Lee, 
Sfrore. Clarence Albert. 
Slate.- Jasper Abraham. 
Speas, Wesley Bethel, 
.Stokes, John Frank, 
Sw4-%-WTfey"Hampton , 
Wall, He nry C lay. Jr., 
Webbr-Brewse.. Rnffin, 
Webb, Joseph Cheshire, 

-Wreryp-P**b»k Stough. 



STUDENTS 




Second, 


Sandifer. 


Second, 


Salem. 


First, 


Mizpab. 


Second, 


Vienna. 


Second, 


Greenville. 


Second, 


Amantha. 


First, 


Rockingham 


Second, 


Hillsboro. 


Second, 


Hillsboro. 


First, 


Raleigh. 


Second, 


Shelby. 




71 



Students in Law. 



Second Year, 



Name. 
Cuningham, Herbert Banatine, 
Reynolds, William Ayres. A.B., X 

(Princeton), 1897, 
Shull, Samuel Eakin, 
Smith, Daniel Westley, 
Wetmore, Silas McBee, 



Residence. 
Cuningham. 

[Pa. 
Philadelphia. 
Stroud sburg, Pa. 
Polkton. 
Lincolnton. 



First Year, 

Adickes, Henning Frederick, Jr., f 
Alexander, Thomas W., 
Allsbrook, Richard Gold, A.B., 1896. J 
Askew. Edward Stevenson. 
Baker, William A., 
Barnes, Elijah Jesse, t 
Best, Benjamin Claude, 
Blair, David Hunt, a.b., f 
(Haverford College), 1891, 

t In attendance at both sessions. 

t At summer session only. 



Asheville. 

Charlotte. 

Scotland Neck. 

Windsor. 

Asheville. 

Smithfield. 

Chapel Hill. 

Winston. 



STUDENTS IN LAW 



.95 



Buxton, Samuel Roland, A.B., t 

(Wake Forest College), 1895, 
Cantwell, William L., t 
Carver, Flemiel Oscar, t 
Cobb, John Walter, 
Cole. Willis Westbrook. 
Connor, Henry Groves, !r., S.B., 1897. f 
Cook, John Henry, t 
Cox. Walter Oscar, t 
Cox, William Gaston, t 
( 'ranor, Hugh Artntield, J 
Curtis, Zeb Prazier, A.M., t 

( Trinity College), 
Darden, William Edward, a.m.. 180(1, f 
Freeman. Kichard Columbus, 
Fuller. .Tones, + 
Callaway, John Marion, Jr., 
Grantham, Elonzo Bowden, % 
Gregory, Edwin Clark, a.b., 1896, % 
Hill. Walter Liddell, t 
Howard, William Stamps, LITT.B.. 1897, f 
Hurley. Riley Thomas, ph.b., r 

{Eton College), 1894, 
Kelley, Benjamin Franklin, 
Kelly, Samuel Luin, t 
Kluttz, Theodore Franklin. Jr.. 
Koehler. Herman Jules, 
I\^enee^-Eli4aJi_Murrill. f 
Little, Judge Elder, t 
Luther, Charles Turner, f 
MacAUister, John David, + 
McCall, Joseph Herbert, 
MacL.ean. Angus Dhu. t 
McNineh. Frank R., 
MacRae, Cameron Farquhar, Jr., t 
MacRae, James C, Jr., 



Jackson. 

Wilson. 

Roxboro. 

Charlotte. 

Harpers. 

Wilson. 

Laurinburg. 

Winston. 

Hertford . 

Wilkesboro. 

Luther. 

Waco, Texas. 

Dobson. 

Raleigh. 

.Madison. 

Newton Grove. 

Halifax. 

Wilkesboro. 

Tarboro. 

Troy. 

Sumter, S. C. 

Franklin. 

Salisbury. [N. J. 

UpperMontclair, 

Jacksonville. 

Longs Store. 

Troy. 

Lumberton, 

Marion. 

Maxton. 

Charlotte. 

Raleigh. 

Fayetteville. 



96 



STUDENTS 



Mason, William Wallace, Chapel Hill. 

M4tte~r, Bachman Brown, Bear Poplar. 

Morrison, Robert Bruce, + Lumberton. 

Jewell, John Franklin, Plows. 

Parker, James Daniel, ph.b., 1898, + Benson. 

Patterson, Adolphus Sherman, Asheville. 

Phifer, Isaac Avery, Morganton. 
Poole, Robert Terrill, a.b., X 

(Trinity College) 1898, Capels Mills. 
Pugh, James Thomas, A.M., 1894, f 

a.m., {Harvard), 1896, Morrisville. 

Roberson, Wescott, a.b., 1896, f Chapel Hill. 

r-ixoamaT r ; Wife yCroom, Washington. 
Ruffin, Thomas, L.L.M., f 

(Georgetown University), 1897, Washington. D.C 

Russell, David' Lester, Hickory. 

Siler, Walter Davis, Siler City. 

Spence, John Brantly, Albemarle. 
Tomlinson, Charles Pawcett, ph.b., 1895, t . Winston. 

Turlington, Zebulon Vance, Benson. 

Warren, Thomas Davis, t Edonton. 

Weatherly, J. M., t Jamestown. 

Whitlock, Paul Cameron, S.B., 1898, % Rockingham. 

White, James Albert, Hobgood. 

Wilson, John Nelson, + Cullowhee. 

Woodson, Walter Henderson, S.B., 1896, f Salisbury. 

69 

Students in Medicine. 



Second Yeai 



Abernethy, Eric Alonzo, 
Bynum, Wade Hampton, 
Costner, George Henry, 
Cromartie, Robert Samuel, a.b., 
(Davidson College) 1895, 



( 'hapel Hill. 
Cermanton. 
Lincolnton. 

Garland. 



STUDENTS IN MEDICINE 



97 



Foseue. John Edward. 

Hargrove, William Franklin. 

Hayes. John Mortimer. 

Hocutt .'J n hn Ii ' v -ing. 

Kagja, Hanry Hermann. 

Kornegay, Emmet. 

McEachern, Edward Clemmons, 

McdixEJ^-Ly-nn. 

Pridgen, Claude Leonard. 

Quickel. Thomas Crouse, 

Rogers, Francis Owing-ton. 

S i.kuUj "G4ta g^ Lewis, 

Speigki-JRichard Harrison. Jr., 

Thompson,, Du n lop. 

5Wh». Claud Hill. 

Williams, Albert Franklin. Jr.. A.B., 1891 

Wood. Edward Jenner, 

First Year. 

Atkins. Benjamin Thomas, 

Baggett. Freddie, 

Barnes. Benjamin Franklin. 

Bellamy, Robert Harllee, 

Brawley. Robert Vance, 

Brem, Walter Vernon. Jr., S.B., 1896, 

Cooke. Frederick Kingsbury. 

Duncan, Charles Litcus. 

English. Edwin Strawbridge, 

Goley, William Uuffin, 

Hardy. Ira May. 

Houston, Charles Edwin, 

Lane. William Kilpatrick. 

Lawson. Robert Baker. 

Lockett, Everett Augustine. 

McFadyen, Paul Rutherford, 

Moore. James Carlyle, 



Polloksville. 

Tarboro. [D. C. 

Washington. 

Earpsboro. 

Bethania. 

Goldsboro. 

Wilmington. 

Sanford. 

Kinston. 

Lincolntan. 

Concord. 

Clinton. 

Wrendale. 

Rowland. 

Raleigh. 

Kenansville. 

Wilming'ton. 



Troy. 

Lydia. 

Elm City. 

Wilmington. 

Mooresville. 

Charlotte. 

Louisburg. 

Beaufort. 

Brevard. 

Graham. 

Chapel Hill. 

Florence. S. C. 

Goldsboro. 

Locust Dale, Va. 

Winston. 

Clarkton. 

McColl, S. C. 



98 



STUDENTS 



Paddison, John Robert, Jr., 
Peacock, James Walter, 
Staley, Sir Walter, 
Underbill, Henry Plato, 
Wilkinson, George Alexander. 



Mt. Airy. 
Salisbury. 
Liberty. 
Selma. 
Tarboro. 
43 



Students in Pharmacy, 
Second Year. 

Gray, P'olk Cleburne, 
Gruver, Charles Dayton, 
Kendrick, Thomas Williams, 
Smith, Charles Henry, 
Suttle, Julius Albert, 
S-wind elk David- Clarence . 
Tate, George Knox, 

Firxt Year. 

Bailey, Reginald, 
-■Brantley, John Calvin, 
Brooks, Jonathan Fleming, 
Craven, Prank McKnight, 
Ellington, Cope Winslo. 
Jacocks, Francis Gillam. 
Koonce, John Edward, 
Landquist, Thomas Eugene, 
McKi-mion, Murdoch Hector, 
McKinnon. William Louis. 
Quiok^ ^nJoiTTTCar 1 , Jr., 
Reed, Joel, 

Taykxr, Frank Leonidas, 
Turner, 



Chapel Hill. 

Stroudsburg, 

Chapel Hill. [Pa 

Greensboro. 

Shelby. 

Rocky Mount. 

Greensboro. 

Winston. 
Marshville. 
Ilendersonville. 
Coddle. 
Elm Grove. 
Windsor. 
Richlands. 
Salem. 
Red Springs. 
Red Springs. 
Lincolnton. 
Concord. 
Oxford. 
Polenta. 
21 



SUMMARY 



99 



SUMMARY. 



The College :- 


- • 










Graduates, 










14 


Undergraduate 


■s, 










Course, 


Arts, Fh 


ilosophy, 


Science, 


Letters. 




Seniors, 


37 


11 


9 


- 


57 


Juniors, 


20 


25 


7 


1 


53 


Sophomores, 


18 


32 


20 


- 


70 


Freshmen, 


31 


43 


21 


- 


95 




-107 


—110 


—57 


-1 




Vear, 


Fifth, 


Third, 


Second. 


First. 




Optional 












Students, 


1 


1 


31 


38 


71 


The Law School : - 








—360 


Second-Year 


Students, 








5 


First-Year Students, 








64 












—69 


The Medical School :— 










Second- Year 


Students. 








21 


First- Year Students. 








22 












—43 


The School of 


Pharmacy 


C '. — 








Second- Year Students, 








7 


First-Year Students. 








14 












—21 


Whole nun: 


iber of Students, 






493 



Names inserted twice. 



489 



ioo 



STUDENTS 



Summary by States. 



North Carolina,' 


451 


Georgia, 


3 


South Carolina, 


10 


Connecticut, 


2 


Virginia, 


5 


Iowa, 


1 


Florida, 


4 


Massachusetts, 


1 


Pennsylvania,' 


3 


New Jersey, 


1 


Tennessee, 


3 


New York, 


1 


District of Colum 


ibia, 3 


Texas, 


1 



Total, 



489 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL, (1898). 



FACULTY. 



EDWIN ANDERSON ALDERMAN, D.C.L., PRESIDENT. 

MARCUS CICERO STEPHENS NOBLE, Superintendent and 
Professor of Pedagogy. 

JOSEPH AUSTIN HOLMES, S.B.. (State Geologist), Lecturer on 
the Geology of North Carolina. 

THOMAS HUME, D.D.. LL.D., Professor of the English Lan- 
guage and Literature. 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., Professor of Geology and Mineralogy. 

CHARLES STAPLES MANGUM, A.B., M.D., Professor of Physi- 
ology. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

HENRY FARRAR LINSCOTT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Class ica I Ph ilo logy. 

SAMUEL MAY, A.B., Instructor in Modern Languages. 

JOHN ALBERT COWAN, Instructor in Expression. 

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

ALEXANDER GRAHAM, A.M., Instructor in United States His- 
tory. 

AUSTIN C. APGAR, Instructor in Botany and Zoology. 

EDWARD PEARSON MOSES. A.M., Instructor in Primary Work. 

PHILANDER PRIESTLY CLAXTON, A.M., Instructor in Ped- 
agogy. 

MARY A. BRYANT, Instructor in English. 

ERNEST PRESTON MANGUM. A.M., Instructor in Geography. 

EDWARD S. JOYNES, A.M., LL.D., Instructor in English. 

GEORGE ADONIJAH GRIMSLEY, Instructor in English, 

JULIUS ISAAC FOUST, A.B., Instructor in Mathematics. 

WILLIAM CHARLES ADAM HAMMEL, Instructor in Physics. 



102 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

J. M. COUGHLIN, Instructor in Pedagogy. 

WILLIAM H. MACE, Ph.D., Instructor in History. 

RAY WHITLOCK, Instructor in Musk. 

MARY SHAKELFORD MacRAE, Instructor in Kindergarten. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

Latin. 

Associate Professor Linscott. 
1 . Rapid reading of Catullus. 2. Teachers' Course. The art of 
reading Latin, syntax, pronunciation, prosody. 

French and German. 
Mr. May. 
1. Elementary German. Reading, exercises and composition. 2. 
Elementary French. Reading, exercises and composition. 
3. Advanced Course. Modern French prose. 

English. 

Professor Hume, Messrs. Jotnbs and Grimsley, Miss Brtant. 
1. English Grammar and Language. 2. The Literary Study of 
the Bible. 3. Lectures on Shakespeare with some review 
of the English drama before his time. 4. English litera- 
ture from the Anglo-Saxon period to the present time. 5. 
Reading and composition. 

Psychology and Pedagogy. 

Messrs. Claxton and CouGHLra. 
1. Psychology and principles of education.. 2. The teaching of 
elementary subjects. 3. Psychology and practical teach- 
ing- 
History. 
Messrs. Mace and Graham. 
1. Method in History. 2. History of the United States and of 
North Carolina. 

Mathematics. 

Professor Noble, Messrs. Foust and Henderson. 
1. Arithmetic. 2. Higher Arithmetic and Algebra. 3. Higher 



COURSES OP INSTRUCTION 103 

Algebra. 4. Plane Geometry. 5. Plane Trigonometry 
and Conic Sections. 

Physics. 

Mr. Hammel. 
1. Elementary Course. Lectures with demonstrations. Con- 
struction of apparatus. 3. Grammar and High School 
course. Experiments. 

Chemistry. 
Associate Professor Baskerville. 
I. General Course. Elementary principles. 2. Teachers' course. 
Laboratory work. 

Biology. 

Professor Mankux and Mr. Apgar. 
1. Botany Introductory course. Practice and Method. 2. Zo- 
ology. Study of birds and insects. Illustration. 3. Physi- 
ology. Teachers' Course. 

Geology. 

Professor EIolmes and Mr. Mangum. 
1. Lectures on the Geology of North Carolina. 2. Geography. 
Lectures and illustrative lessons. 

Primary Work. 
Mr. Moses. 
1. Methods in primary instruction. 

Kindergarten. 
Miss MacRae. 
1. Practical Course. Gifts and occupations. Stories and games. 

Music. 

Miss WiUT-LOCK. 

1. Lecture Course. Methods of teaching music in the public 
schools. 

Educational Conferences. 

Each day there is a conference of the entire school for the dis- 
cussion of vital matters relating to the theory and practice of 
teaching and to school administration. The superintendents of 
the city schools and other prominent educators lead in these dis- 
cussions. 
7 



104 THE SUMMER SCHOOL 

Lectures. 

A series of lectures is delivered by the Faculty, and by promi- 
nent speakers from abroad. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Every student in the Summer School who is not a member of 
another department of the University may receive a certificate of 
attendance and work satisfactorily completed. A student who is 
already a member of another department of the University, or a 
student whe desires to enter another department, is credited for 
work done in the Summer School upon which he has passed a sat- 
isfactory examination. Opportunity is thus afforded to young men 
of limited means to diminish the time required for a degree, while 
teachers of special subjects in. the public or private schools may, 
by attending several sessions of the Summer School, complete the 
University courses in any department of study offered. 

EXPENSES. 

The expenses of the Summer School are five dollars for tuition 
and one dollar for registration. A student in the Summer Sohool 
has no other fee to pay unless he take Chemistry 2 in which there 
is a charge of two dollars for materials and breakage. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION. 

The summer School begins on the Tuesday before the third 
Wednesday in June and ends on the second Friday in July. All 
persons desiring to be admitted are expected to present themselves 
at 10 A. M., in Gerrard Hall, on the first day of the session. 

All members of the Summer School enjoy the same privileges 
with other students in the Unversity. 

STUDENTS. 

Name. Residence. 

Abernethy, Eric Alonzo, Chapel Hill. 

Alderman, J. T., A.B., Columbus, Ga. 

Allen, Arch Turner, ph.b.. York Institute. 

Allen, Nellie, Rockingham. 



STUDENTS 



.105 



Alston, Charles Skinner, 

Anderson, Ella, 

Applewhite, Mary K.. 

Atwater, Fannie, 

Bag-by, Gertrude M., 

Baker, Amelia. 

Baldwin, Bertha, 

Battle. Susan S., 

Beckwith, Mrs. K. R., 

Bellamy, Lizzie. 

Bennett, Lillie. 

Bennett, M. D. (Miss). 

Blair, Emma H., 

Boger, Charles Edgar, a.b., 

Bowling, Edgar Simeon, 

Bradsher, Eugenia, 

Breeze, Laura, 

Broadfoot, Kate Huske, 

Brogden, Lautrec Qranmer, ph.b., 

Brown, Jane, B. E.. 

Bryan, Kathleen. 

Bryan. Margaret, 

Bryan, William Prank, 

Bunn, James Philips. 

Bur well, Irene. 

Carr, Julian Shakespeare, Jr.. 

Chadwick, May Bell. 

Chadbourn, George, 

Cheek, Pearl, 

Cleveland, Frederick Lewis, 

Cornelison, William Loranza, 

Cox. John G., 

Cromartie, Mary. 

Currie, Daniel Johnson, a.m.. 

Davis, J. E. B..PH.B., 

Dickson, Mary Flinn, 

Dodson, Mary E., 



Littleton. 

Cedar Grove. 

Scotland Neck. 

Riggsbee. 

Wilmington. 

Windsor. 

Rockingham. 

Rocky Mount. 

Washington. 

Raleigh. 

Wadesboro. 

Wadesboro. 

High Point. 

Flows. 

Rougemont. 

Olive Hill. 

Nelson. 

Fayetteville. 

Greensboro. 

Newbern. 

Newbern. 

Newbern. 

Goldsboro. 

Rocky Mount. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Durham. 

Beaufort. 

Wilmington. 

Chapel Hill. 

Chapel Hill. 

Cagles Mills. 

Kinston. 

Fayetteville. 

Chapel Hill. 

Kenly. 

Morganton. 

Concord. 



106 



*HK SUMSlfcK SCHOOL 



Dula, Flora Lee, 

Eley, May me E., 

Elmore, Julia. 

Farabow, Lucie, 

Fletcher, Robert Smith, ph.b., 

Foust, Thomas Roswell, S.B., 

Graham, Amma Daniel, 

Graham. Mary Owen, 

Green, Alice, 

Gregory, Emily, 

Gudger, Annie Elizabeth, 

Hackney. Henryanna Clay, A.B.; 

Harris. Fannie Louise, 

Haviland, Walter W., A.B., 

Haywood. William Grimes, Litt.b. 

Hendren. Mary L.. 

Herndon. Carrie D., 

Herndon. Jennie. PH.B., 

Herring. Bettie. 

Herring, Ethel, 

Hicks, Mrs. A. A., 

Hill, Frances L., 

Holden, Lizzie, 

Holeman, Hallie, 

Hook, H. Lula, 

Horner, Nina, 

Horner, Mrs. W. D., 

Hughes, Eva R.. 

Ireland, O. J., 

Irvine, Anne L., 

James, Thomas Thayer, A.B., 

Jones, Leah D., 

Jones, Mary L., 

Joyner, James Henry, 

Kahn, Cornelia, M.u.. 

Koontz, Gertha, 

Lane, William Cobb, A.B., 



Old Fort. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Elmore. 

Stem. 

Gibson. 

Newbern. 

Warrenton. 

Charlotte. 

Wilmington. 

Greensboro. 

Waynesville. 

Guilford College. 

Charlotte. 

Philadelhia. Pa. 

Raleigh. 

Newbern. 

Durhain. 

Elon College. 

Daughton. 

Daughton. 

Oxford. 

Concord. 

Hillsboro. 

Durham. 

Rock Hill. S. C. 

Oxford. 

Henderson. 

Rock Hill, S. C. 

Faison. 

Milton. 

Lumpkin, Ga. 

Newbern. 

Newbern. 

Nashville. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Salisbury. 

Goldsboi-o. 



STUDENTS 



107 



Lewis, Kate, 
Leslie. Lena M., 
Lilly. Mrs. Edmund Jones. 
Linder. Mrs. N. M., 
Little. Madge, 
Lockett. Everett Augustine. 
Loftin. Maria D., 
Long. Annie. 
Lowe, L. Olivia. 
Mclver. M. Caroline. 
McNair, John Lytch, 
McNeill. Isaac H.. 
McRae. Duncan K.. a.b., 
MacRae, Mrs. J. C. 
Matics. Alexander Marion, 
Matics, Mary Virginia. - 
Means, Pauline, E.. 
Mallett. Alice H.. 
Mallett. Carrie G. . 
Miller. Eva. 

Miller. James Daniel, a.b.. 
Monaghan. N.. 
Moore, Fannie B.. 
Morgan, Margaret. 
Xeely, Bessie Fleming. 
Oldham, Jennie F., 
Palmer. Jacocb Micheau, 
Palmer. Sallie Milam, 
Pannill. Florence, 
Parsley. Susan LeRoy, 
Pasmore. Stella L.. 
Patterson. Edmund Vogler. 
Perkins, Annie. 
Pittman, Annie M.. 
Pond, Elizabeth. 
Red ford. Minnie, 



Milton. 

Concord. 

Fayetteville. 

Union, S. C. 

Wadesboro. 

Winston. 

Kenansville. 

Burlington. 

Berea. 

Darlington, S. C. 

Laurel Hill. 

Millers Creek. 

Laurinburg. 

Fayetteville. 

Henderson. 

Henderson. 

Concord. 

Fayetteville. 

Fayetteville. 

Winston. 

Greensboro. 

Fayetteville. 

Charlotte. 

Laurel Hill. 

Salisbury. 

Teer. 

Greenback. 

Greenback. 

Reidsville. 

Wilmington. 

Gary. 

Salem. 

Greenville. 

Whitakers. 

Chapel Hill. 

Raleigh. 



108 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Richmond, Annie H., 

Roan, Ada, 

Roberson, N. E., 

Roberts. Hortense, 

Robinson, Mrs. J. A., 

Ross, John Kirkland, 

Shepard, Mary F., 

Slade, L. E. (Miss), 

Sloan, James Harris, 

Snipes, William Seaton, ph.b., 

Stephens, Kemp Battle, 

Street, Nannie P., 

Thomas, Julia Manney, 

Thompson, Fannie E., 

Thompson, Holland, ph.b., 

Thompson, Sallie, 

Twine, Lucye M., 

Tyson, Grace, 

Vaughan, Emma L., 

Wall, Ada, 

Walton, Arthur Guy, 

Weatherly, Elsie, 

Weatherly, Lillian, 

Wetmore, Annie T., 

White, Emma L., 

Willis, Florence F., 

Wilson, Nathan Hunt Daniel. A.B., 

Winston, Isabella, 

Wood, Fannie, 

Wood, Margaret, 

Worth, Laura Delphina, B.S.. 

Wyche, Richard Thomas, 

Yates, Lydia A., 



Milton. 
Winston. 
East Durham. 
Rock Hill, S. C. 
Durham. 
Charlotte. 
Wilmington. 
Durham. 
Salisbury. 
Winston. 
Chapel Hill. 
Newbern. 
Beaufort. 
Pittsboro. 
Concord. 
Chapel Hill. 
Winfall. 
Salisbury. 
Scotland Neck. 
Madison. 
Jacksonville. 
Greensboro. 
Greensboro. 
Greensboro. 
Belvidere. 
Wilmington. 
Chapel Hill. 
Austin. Texas. 
Gibson. 
Laurel Hill. 
Guilford College. 
Atlantic. 
Wilmington. 
U7 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



OFFICERS. 



EBEN ALEXANDER, Ph.D., LL.D., Supervisor. 
RALPH HENRY GRAVES, A.M., Librarian. 
FRED JACKSON COXE, Assistant. 
JUNIUS DANIEL GRIMES, Assistant. 

The University Library numbers twenty-nine thousand volumes 
and about twelve thousand pamphlets. It is arranged in twenty- 
two subdivisions, of which the following are the chief : — 

Reference. Literature and Languages, 

Political and Social Science, Mythology and Art, 

Science and Useful Arts, Modern Languages, 

Poetry and Drama. Jurisprudence, 

Religion and Theology, Biography and Memoirs, 

Latin, Greek and Sanskrit. Education, 

Medicine and Hygiene, Fiction. 

History. Mathematics, 

Public Documents. 
The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies have made a 
donation of their valuable collection of twenty thousand volumes 
to the Library, and provided for its perpetual endowment. The 
official title of the Library is now The Library of the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina endowed by the Dialectic and 
Philanthropic Literary Societies. 

The funds available for the increase of the Library are ex- 
pended semi-annually under the direction of the Supervisor, the 
Librarian, and Library Committee, with special reference to the 
instruction given in the University. The annual increase from 
purchase, bequests and exchanges averages about two thousand 
volumes. The books are carefully arranged and catalogued by 
subject and author. 



110 THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

Extensive improvements in the arrangement and administration 
of the Library have been made in the direction of better light, 
more room, and greater efficiency and comfort. The Librarian 
and his Assistants are in attendance to give help in any line of re- 
search or reading. The reading-room is supplied with the best 
foreign and American periodicals and the leading newspapers of 
the State and Nation. The students of the University are allowed 
access, under necessary limitations, to the book-shelves. The Li- 
brary and the Reading-room are open every weekday from 9 A. M. 
to 1 p. M,, and from 2 to 5 P. M. 

The University acknowledges gifts to the Library during the 
past year from E. A. Alderman. Eben Alexander, Edwin S. Balch, 
J. W. Barnwell, K. P. Battle, Mrs. M. E. Bridgers, E. McN. Carr, 
J. S. Carr, J. S. Carr, Jr.. T. L. M. Curry. J. H. Fitts, Miss A. L. 
Fries, H. H. Hanna, Carter H. Harrison, J. A. Holmes, J. B. Kil- 
lebrew, S. P. Langley, D. McGihany, John Manning, L. Miller. J. 
R. Parsons, W. T. Patterson, Mrs. S. C. Phillips, Mrs. M. A. Pot- 
ter, C. L. Raper, L. C. Root, J. F. Steward, W. McE. Walton, W. 
L. Welch, H. L. Wheeler. Cambria Steel Co., President of Cornell 
University, Gratz College, Hellenian Editors of 1898, President of 
Hobart College. King and Richardson, Lambda Chapter of Phi 
Kappa Sigma, A. C. Leeds & Co. . Mecklenburg Monumental Asso- 
ciation,North Carolina Secretary of State, Peabody Institute, Penn- 
sylvania Society of Sons of the Re volution, Philadelphia Text-Book 
Society, Presbyterian Publishing Committee, Richmond, Va., 
Princeton University, Royal Society of Canada, F. H. Revell & 
Co., South Carolina State Library, Superintendent of Documents 
of the United States, Union Club, N. Y., United States Geological 
Survey, and the publishers of American Economist. Asheville Cit- 
izen, Book Reviews, Caucasian, Christian Advocate. Christian 
Worker, Church Standard, Commonwealth, Davidson Monthly, 
Fairbrother's Farrago, Fayetteville Observer. Franklin Times, 
Cuilford Collegian, Hartford Seminary Record. Home Rule. Hom- 
iletic Review, Journal (Winston). King's Weekly, -Landmark, Liv- 
ing Church, Mascot, Messenger of Hope. Missionary Review, 
Money, Newton Enterprise, Norfolk Virginian. North Carolina 



THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 111 

Medical Journal, North Carolina Presbyterian. Patron and 
Gleaner. Presbyterian (Philadelphia). Progressive Farmer, Pro- 
testant Episcopal Review. Smithiield Herald. Southern Medical 
Journal. State Normal Magazine. Sunday School Times. Temple. 
Times-Democrat, Traveler's Record, Trinity Archive. Twin-City 
Sentinel, Wake Forest Student, Weekly Journal of ( 'ommerce 
and Commercial Bulletin. Wilmington Messenger. Wilson Ad- 
vance, Zion's Landmark. 



LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS. 



THE PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 

JOSHUA WALKER GORE, C.E., Director and Professor of 

Physics. 
WILLIAM EDWARD COX, Assistant in Physics. 

The Physical Laboratory, consisting of three communicating 
rooms, adjoins the lecture room on the first, floor of the South 
Building. A small room connecting with the laboratory is fitted 
up for a workshop, being provided with lathes for wood and metal, 
and tools for repairing and making apparatus. The apparatus for 
class-room illustration is kept in large cases in the lecture room. 

The members of the Junior Class are required to make a lim- 
ited number of experiments to familiarize themselves some- 
what with the methods of experimentation, to acquire facility in 
handling instruments of precision, and to cultivate the power of 
observation. 

The laboratory is quite well provided with instruments of pre- 
cision for electrical testing and measuring. The class in the ad- 
vanced course of electricity devote considerable time to such work. 
The equipment consists of dynamos, motors, galvanometers, elec- 
trometers, dynamometers, volt meters, ammeters, condensers, with 
their various accessories, secondary cells, standard cells, standard 
resisting coils, etc. 

THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

FRANCIS PRESTON V ENABLE, Ph.D., Director and Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry. 

CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Chem- 
istry. 

THOMAS CLARKE, Ph.D., Assistant in Chemistry. 

The building formerly known as Person Hall is now used as the 



THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY AXD MUSEUM 113 

Chemical Laboratory. It has been greatly added to and forms a 
convenient and well-arranged system of laboratories. The rooms 
are eleven in number and contain about six thousand square feet 
of floor space. The pitch of the rooms is twenty feet, and they are 
lighted by numerous large windows, five feet by ten feet in size. 
Thus good ventilation and light are secured.- 

.There is a large lecture room with a seating capacity of one 
hundred and twenty-five. The sides and rear of the room have 
glass cases for the display of specimens. The room is lighted by 
electricity. In addition to its use as a lecture room, it is used as 
a place of meeting by the Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society. 

Adjoining: the lecture room, is the private laboratory of the Sen- 
ior Professor of Chemistry, and a smaller room for the storage of 
specimens. The west wing of the laboratory is divided into labor- 
atories for qualitative and quantitative analysis, furnishing desk- 
space for forty-eight students and fifteen students respectively. 
These laboratories are provided with hoods for carrying off nox- 
ious gases. There is a small room also, cut off from the other lab- 
oratories, in which dangerous or disagreeable experiments may 
be performed. 

The rear portion of the laboratory is almost a reproduction of 
the front in size and outline. It is divided into a balance room 
and library, a dark room for work with the polariscope and spec- 
troscope and for photography, an assay room provided with a set 
of gas furnaces, a laboratory for toxicological or other special 
work, and a storeroom. In the assay room is placed a large still, 
which provides an abundance of distilled water. 

The laboratories are supplied with gas and water. The expen- 
ditures for apparatus amount to about one thousand dollars annu- 
ally. 

THE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM. 

HENRY Van PETERS WILSON, Ph.D., Director and Professor 

of Biology. 
ALBERT FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, JR., A.B., Assistant in Bioh 

mi- 

EDWARD .TENNER WOOD, Assistant in Biology. 



114 THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSBUM 

The Biological Laboratory occupies the upper floor of the New 
East Building', and includes a lecture-room, amain laboratory, two 
smaller laboratories for advanced students, a private workroom 
and a storeroom. The entire floor space is something over four 
thousand square feet. 

The general equipment is good, and is adapted to the needs of 
modern microscopical work, including compound and dissecting 
microscopes, microtomes, paraffino and hot air baths, incubator, 
dissecting microscopes, camera lucidas. immersion lenses, etc. 
All rooms in the laboratory are supplied with running water. 
In addition to the sinks, there are several large aquarium tables 
in which living animals may be kept for breeding purposes, study 
of their habits or class work. 

The museum collections are arranged in cases in the main labor- 
atory. The marine fauna of the Atlantic coast is well represented. 
There are very serviceable collections of bird skins, bird eggs, in- 
sects, and flowering plants. Students engaged in advanced work 
have access to microscopic preparations, illustrating the anat- 
omy and development of sponges and corals, the histology of 
medusae, the development of teleosts and other objects of morpho- 
logical interest. The departmental library includes many valuable 
books of reference, treatises and zoological journals. 

THE GEOLOGICAL LABORATORY AND MUSEUM 

COLLIER COBB, A.M., Director and Professor of Geology and 

Mineralogy. 
HENRY MAUGER LONDON, Assistant in Geology. 

The Geological Laboratory occupies the first floor of the New 
East Building. In addition to a lecture room with a seating capac- 
ity of about ninety students, there is a large laboratory supplied 
with working collections of minerals, rocks, and fossils, and with 
photographs, maps and models illustrating geological structure. 
The laboratory is furnished with two petrographical microscopes. 
Microscopic slides have been made of most of the specimens from 



The geological laboratory and museum 115 

North Carolina : and the department has, also, sections of the typ- 
ical European minerals and rocks. Sections of the rocks round 
Chapel Hill, and the igneous rocks of the Boston Basin, made by 
the late Hunter Lee Harris, of the class of 1889, have been donated 
to the geological department. 

The University possesses a collection of more than two thousand 
specimens of typical rocks and minerals from various European 
localities, and of large specimens of building stones, coals and va- 
rious products illustrating the economic geology of the State. 
These are arranged in an exhibition room of six hundred and fifty 
square feet of floor space. Here are kept also the sections taken 
with a diamond drill in the coal regions of Pennsylvania, in the 
region round King's Mountain, where the Summer School in Geol- 
ogy holds its sessions, in the Dan River coal fields and in the 
Triassic Rocks at Durham. N. C. A complete set of the ores of 
the precious metals found along the line of the Atchison, Topeka 
and Sante Fe Railroad has recently been added to the collection. 
Valuable additions have been made to the collections of fossils also, 
affording increased opportunity for laboratory work in historical 
geology and paleontology. The collection illustrating economic 
geology has been largely increased by many fine specimens se- 
cured by Professor Holmes from the Atlanta exhibition. 

The departmental library, which occupies a room adjoining the 
exhibition room, is supplied with State and United States Reports, 
the papers of working geologists, the best works upon geology, 
and scientific periodicals. 



THE GYMNASIUM. 



JAMES WILLIAM C ALDER, Instructor in Physical Culture. 

Memorial Hall is used as the University Gymnasium, affording a 
practically unlimited supply of air, light and space for all sorts of 
gymnastic exercises. Inside of the hall is a running track one 
twelfth of a mile long ; and there is an abundant supply of improv- 
ed gymnastic apparatus. The general supervision of the Gymna- 
sium is in the hands 1 , of a committee of two members of the Faculty, 
one of them being the physician of the University. Exercise in 
the Gymnasium is required three hours a week of all members of 
the College except Seniors. 

A thorough physical examination of each student is made in the 
fall and in the spring. The measurements are outlined on charts, 
to show the parts of the body below the normal development, for 
which special exercises suited to the health and physicial condi- 
tion of the individual are suggested. Three indoor athletic and 
gymnastic contests are also held ( during December, January and 
February. 

Outdoor sports are encouraged as being beneficial to the stu- 
dents, and very helpful in the discipline of college life. An ath- 
letic field has been enclosed and improved by the generosity of 
the Alumni. It affords ample room for football and baseball. 
The Lake Running Track, one sixth of a mile long with a hundred 
yard dash, has recently been added to the athletic equipment 
of the University by the generosity of Mr. Henry Steers Lake 
of the Class of 1898. It affords fine facilities for all sorts of track 
athletics. 



THE UNIVERSITY ORGANIZATIONS. 



THE DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC LITERARY 
SOCIETIES. 

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Literary Societies were organ- 
ized in 1795, the year of the opening of the University. Their ex- 
istence has been inseparably linked with that of the University, 
and they have shown remarkable power in developing character 
as well as in training the intellect. They offer facilities for prac- 
tice in debate, oratory, declamation and essay writing; and their 
members become practically familiar with parliamentary law and 
usage. 

Each society owns a large handsomely furnished hall, the walls 
of which are hung with oil portraits of illustrious members. 
Meetings are held by each society every Saturday night during 
the college year, admission being confined to members. Public 
contests in debate between the two societies are conducted twice a 
year. During commencement week, each society holds its own an- 
nual festival, upon which occasion medals are awarded for excel- 
lence in debate, oratory, declamation and essay writing. On 
Tuesday night preceding Commencement, six representatives 
elected from the two societies have a public competition in oratory, 
and a medal is awarded to the successful competitor. 

By immemorial custom, students from the eastern half of the 
State usually join the Philanthropic Society, while those from the 
western half join the Dialectic Society. Although membership in 
the societies is entirely optional, yet it is earnestly recommended 
by the Faculty as furnishing unusual opportunities not only for 
literary culture, but also for the development of self-control and 
the power to persuade and control others. 



118 THE NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

THE PHILOLOGICAL CLUB. 

Thomas Hume. D.D., LL.D., President. 

Henry Farrar Linscott, Ph.D., Vice President. 

Samuel May, A.B., Secretary and Treasurer. 
The Philological Club meets on the last Tuesday night of each 
month during- the College year except December and May. Its 
membership consists of the instructors and advanced students in 
the language departments of the University. The object of the 
club is to stimulate original investigation in philology and litera- 
ture, and to afford an opportunity for the interchange of views on 
subjects relating to such work. At each meeting papers are read 
and discussed. All persons interested in the work of the club are 
invited to attend its meetings. 

THE SHAKSPERE CLUB. 

Thomas Hume, D.D., LL.D.. President. 

Henry Farrar Linscott, Ph.D., Vice President. 

William Johnston Horney, A.B., Secretary. 

Henry Patrick Harding, Treasurer. 
The Shakspere Club was organized in October, 1895, for the 
special purpose of giving impulse and guidance to scholarly inves- 
tigation of the great dramatist. But an important aim was to of- 
fer opportunity for comparative studies in the dramatic literature 
of ancient and foreign languages, and also to excite interest in the 
art of literary composition. Seminary methods are pursued by ad- 
vanced students, and the results are presented in papers. The 
club has a small but valuable collection of special reference 
books. 

THE NORTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Kemp Plummer Battle," LL.D., President. 
Edwin Anderson Alderman, D.C.L., Vice President. 
Henry Mauuer London, Seeretary. 
The North Carolina Historical Society was founded in 1842 by 



■ THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY 119 

the Hon. David L. Swain. LL.D., President of the University. 
Under his leadership it became the center of historical work in 
the State and the medium of many notable contributions to State 
history. On March 22, 1875. through the activity of Dr. Battle, 
the Society was chartered by an Act of the General Assembly. 
The purpose of the Society is to collect, classify, investigate and 
publish material illustrative of the history of the State. The His- 
torical Society possesses a valuable collection of books, pamphlets, 
manuscripts, newspaper hies, coins and other objects of historic 
interest. The-educational aim of the society is to create a love of 
historical study and to give training in scientific methods of his- 
torical investigation. To this end meetings are held monthly in 
the historical lecture room, at which papers, based on original 
research, are read and discussed. All members of the University 
are eligible to membership. 

THE ELISHA MITCHELL SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY. 

Josjeph Austin Holmes, S.B.. President. 

Charles Staples Mangum, A.B.. M.D.. Vice President. 

Francis Preston Yen able. Ph.D., Permanent Secretary 

and Treasurer. 
Charles Baskerville. Ph.D.. Corresponding Secretary. 
The Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society holds monthly meetings 
during the college year for the discussion of scientific subjects. 
A journal is issued semiannually. The object of the Society is 
to encourage scientific research and to record such matters as 
pertain to the natural history of the State. The membership 
is at present restricted to the Faculty and students of the Uni- 
versity. 

At the monthly meetings, which are ordinarily held on the 
second Tuesday of each month, excellent opportunities are afford- 
ed the students to get beyond the ordinary routine of the class 
room by hearing, reading and discussing papers on scientific sub- 
jects. 

The Journal is in a measure a bulletin of the scientific labor- 
atories of the University, and contains many articles written by 



120 THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

students. It is now in its fourteenth year. The volumes already 
issued contain over twelve hundred pages. By the exchange of 
the Journal with over three hundred scientific journals and peri- 
odicals, ten thousand books and pamphlets have been collected, 
all of which are arranged in the University Library. 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Thomas Gilbert Pearson, B.S., President. 

Halcott Anderson, Vice President. 

George Vernon Cowpek, Recording Secretary. 

Allen Johnson Barwick, Treasurer. 
The Young Men's Christian Association is a voluntary organiza- 
tion of the students in the University, and is entirely under their 
management. The Faculty are in sympathy with the Association, 
and render sei-vice whenever requested to do so. 

The object of the Association is to promote growth in grace and 
Christian fellowship among its members, and aggressive Christian 
work among the students. To this end two meetings are held 
every week on Tuesday and Thursday evenings, tor twenty min- 
utes, just after supper. On the second Thursday of each month 
the service is taken up with the discission of missionary work. 
Five Bible classes are devoted to personal work,, devotional, topi- 
cal and historical study, and the life and teachings of Christ. In 
addition to these classes, Professor Battle delivers a half-hour 
lecture each Sunday morning on the historical aspect of the Bible. 
An efficient committee look after the welfare of the sick in the 
University and see that they lack no comfort nor convenience. 

A vigorous movement is on foot to raise twenty thousand dol- 
lars for a Y. M. C. A., building. Over ten thousand dollars have 
already been subscribed by the students and by others interested 
in the work. It is now hoped that the building will he erected 
during the coming year. 

On some Saturday evening near the opening of the College 
year, the Association gives it annual reception to students enter- 
ing the University. 



ONE HUNDRED AND THIRD COM- 
MENCEMENT (1898). 



MAY 29, BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

Tire Reverend Wilbur Fisk Tillett, D.D. 

MAY 30. 

Orations by Representatives from the Dialectic and 
Philanthropic Literary Societies. 
Dialectic Society. Philanthropic Society. 

Thomas Contee Bowie, Edgar David Broadhurst, 

Gilbert Roscoe Swink. Robert DIggs Wimberly Connor. 

Faculty Reception in Commons Hall. 
JUNE 1, COMMENCEMENT. 

Senior Speaking. 

Pleasant Daniel Gold, Jr., Charles Hughes Johnston, 

Edward Kidder Graham, James Daniel Parker. 

Address by the Honorable Hannis Taylor, LL.D. 

DEGREES. 

In Course. 

Bachelor of Arts. 

Edward Lawrence Abbott, Charles Hughes Johnston, 

Ira Edgerton Dwight Andrews, Richard Henry Lewis, Jr., 



122 CEBTIFICATES 

Richard Smith Busbee, John Gilchrist McCormick, 

Charles Stuart Carr, John Kenneth Pfohl, 

Samuel Pearson Copple, Sallie Walker Stockard, 

Pleasant Daniel Gold, Jr.. William Thomas Usry, 

Archibald Henderson, John Frederick Webb. 

Bachelor of Philosophy. 

Lorenzo James Bell, Percy Wood McMullan, 

Willis James Brogden. James Daniel Parker, 

Calvert Rogers Dey, Edward Emmett Sams, 

Edward Kidder Graham, Oscar Milton Suttle. 

Bachelor of Science. 

Vernon Luther Brown, Eddie Nevin Moize, 

Robert Edward Follin, Walter Rice Thompson, 

Fred Wooten Foscue, Herbert Dillon Walker, 

John Wright Johnson, Percy Du Ponceau Whitaker, 

Paul Cameron Whitlock. 

Bachelor of Letters. 

William Grimes Haywood, Henry Faison Peirce. 

Bachelor of Laws. 

Charles Exum Best, Samuel Selden Lamb, 

William Demsie Grimes, Oliver Stockard Newlin. 

Master of Arts. 

Ralph Henry Graves, A.B., 1897. 
John Knox Hair, ph.b., (Furman) 1894, A.B., m.m.ph., (Ibid) 1897. 

Doctor of Philosophy. 

Thomas James Wilson, Jr., A.B., 1894, A.M., 189<i. 

CERTIFICATES. 

Greek : Charles Hughes Johnston. 



MEDALS AND PBIZES 123 

Latin: Henry Meredith. 

English : Lorenzo James Bell, Edward Kidder Graham, 
Charles Hughes Johnston. 

Physics: Edward Lawrence Abbott, Edward Emmett Sams. 
Chemistry : William Grimes Haywood. 
Biology : Edward Jenner Wood. 

MEDALS AND PRIZES. 

The Holt Medal : Ernest Horatio Woodson. 

The Hume Medal : Willis James Brogden. 

The Mangum Medal : Edward Kidder Graham. 

The Representatives' Medal : Edgar David Broadhurst. 

The Hill Prize : Pleasant Daniel Gold, Jr. 

The Harris Prize : George Mary Pate. 

The Worth Prize : Charles Hughes Johnston. 

The Manning Prize : Charles Exum Best. 

The Wilson Prize : William McEntire Walton. 

The Materia Medica Prize : George Edgar Newby. 



SUMMARY. 

Boards of Government and Instruction, and Other Officers. 

Trustees I 80 

Faculty r 21 

Instructors _. - 5 

Assistants . .- 10 

■ 36 

Summer School Faculty ._. 25 

Preachers to the University. — 5 

Other Officers.. - _ 5 

Students. 

The College :— 

Graduate Students- - _ 14 

Senior Class— _ — 57 

Junior Class _ _ 53 

Sophomore Class _... 70 

Freshman Class 95 

Optional Students 71 

360 

The Law School :— 

Second- Year Students 5 

First- Year Students H4 



69 



The Medical School :— 
Second- Year Students. 
First- Year Students 



43 

The School of Pharmacy :• - 

Second- Year Students 7 

First- Year Students 14 

21 

The Summer School 147 

Whole number of Students ...- 640 

Names inserted twice 17 

623 



LNDEX. 



Admission of Optional students, 67 
Women, 56, 
to Advanced Standing. 64. 
( 'ollege, 65. 
Law school, 72. 
Medical School, 79. 
School of Pharmacy, 82. 
Summer school, 104. 
Aid. Pecuniary, 58. 
Anglo Saxon, Courses in, 81, 32. 
Assignment of Rooms, 62. 
Assistants, 18. 
Athletic Sports. 10, 116. 
Bachelor's Degree. See Degree. 
Beneficiary Aid, 58 
Biological Laboratory, 113. 
Biology, Courses in, 40, 103. 
Board. See Expenses. 
Calendar, 6. 

Candidacy for Advanced Degrees, 54. 
Certificates, in College, 52, 122. 

Summer School, 104. 
Chapel Exercises. 11. 
Charter of the University, 7. 
Chemical Laboratory, 112 
Chemistry. Courses in. 38, 103. 
Christian' Association, 120. 
Classical Philology, i ourses in, 27. 
College, 21. 

Admission to, 63. 
Expenses, 60 
Registration, 68. 
Scholarships, 58. 
Year. 10. 
Commencement, 10, 121. 

Parts, 51. 121. 
Committees, of Faculty, 18. 
Trustees. 14. 
Conditions, Examination for the Re- 
moval of, 60. 
Conferences, Educational, 104. 
Content?. Table of, 3. 
('ourses for Students not Candidates for 

a Degree, 52 
Courses leading to Degrees, 48^ 
Bachelor of Arts, 48. 
Laws, 71 
Philosophy, 49. 
Science, 50. 
Courses of Instruction. See Greek, etc 
Culture, General, 11. 
Physical, 10. 
Religious, 11. 
Degree of Bachelor of Arts, 10, 48, 63, 121. 
Bachelor of Laws. 10. 71. 122. 
Bachelor of Philosophy, 10, 49, 

64, 122. 
Bachelor of Science, 10, 50, 64. 

122. 
Doctor of Philosophy, 10, 50, 
122. 



Master of Arts, 10, 55, 122. 
Master of Philosophy, 10, 55. 
Master of Science, 10. 55. 
Degrees conferred in 1898, 121. 
with Distinction, 51. 
Departments of Instruction, 20. 
Dialectic Literary Society, 117. 
Discipline, 11. 

Doctor of Philosophy, 10, 55. 122. 
Dormitory Accommodations, 01. 
Education, History and Philosophy of, 

See Pedagogy. 
Educationa" conferences. 104. 
Elective Studies, 48. 
Elisha Mitchell Scientific Society, 119. 
English, Courses in, 30. 102. 
for Admission. 63. 
Prizes in 57. 
Equipment of the University, 9. 
Examinations for Admission, see Ad- 
mission. 
Examinations for Removal of Condi- 
tions, 66. 
Expenses, College, 60. 

Law school. 72. 
Medical School, 78. 
School of Pharmacy. 82. 
Summer School, 104. 
Faculty, College, 21. 

Law School, 69. 
Medical School. 74. 
School of Pharmacy, 80. 
Summer School, 101. 
University. 15. 
Fees. See Expenses. 
Free Tuition, 60. 
French, Courses in, 29, 102. 
Geological Laboratory, 114. 
Geologv and Mineralogy, Courses in 42 
103. 

Prize in, 57. 
Summer Courses in, 
44, 103. 
German, Courses in, 28, 102. 
Government of the University, 7. 
Grades of Scholarship, 51. 
Graduate Students, 54. 

Admission of, 54. 
Degrees, 54. 
Greek. Courses in, 23. 

for Admission, 63. 
Prize in. 58. 
Gymnasium, 116. 
History. Courses in, 33, 102. 

Prize in, 57. 
History and Philosophy of Education. 

See Pedagogy. 
Holidays, 10. 
Infirmary, 10. 

Instruction. Courses of. See Greek, 
Latin, etc. 



126 



INDEX 



Laboratory, Biological, 113. 
Chemical, 112. 
Geological, 114. 
Physics. 113. 
Latin, Courses in, 34, 103. 
for Admission, 63. 
Law School, 09. 

Admission. 72. 
Courses of Instruction. 69 
Degree of LL. P.., 71. 
Expenses, 73. 
Faculty, 69. 
Moot Court, 71. 
Pecuniary Aid, 73. 
Registration, 72. 
Students, 94. 
Summer School. 73. 
Li brary, University, 109. 
Literary .Societies, 117. 
Loan Funds. 60. 
Location of the University, 9. 
Master's Degree. See Degree. 
Mathematics, ( 'ourses in, 36, 102. 

for Admission. 64. 
Prize in, 57. 
Medals, 57. 123. 
Medical Attention. 11. 
Medical School, 74. 

Admission, 79. 
Courses of Instrue 

. tion, 74. 
Expenses. 78. 
Faculty, 74. 
Pecuniary Aid, 78. 
Registration. 79, 
Students, 96. 
Mental and Moral Science. See Pbilos 

ophy. 
Metaphysics See Philosophy. 
Mineralogy, see Geology. 
Modern Languages. See German, etc. 
Music, Courses in. 103. 
Natural Philosophy. See Physics. 
North Carolina Historical Society, 118. 
Officers in University, 19. 
Optional Students. 93. 

Admission of, 67. 
Organizations of the University. 117. 

Elisha Mitchell Scientific 

Society, 119 
North Carolina Historic 

Society, 118. 
Philological Club, 118. 
shakespere Club, 118. 
Young Men's Christian 
Association, 120. 
Pecuniary Aid, in College, 57. 

Law School, 73. 
Medical School, 78. 
Pedagogy. Courses in, 44, 103. 
Prize in, 58. 
Philanthropic Literary Society. 117. 
Philological Club, 118. 
Philosophy, Courses in, 32. 

Prize in. 58. 
Physical Culture, 10. 
Physical Laboratory- 113. 
Physics, Courses in, 37. 103.- 



Political and Social Science, Courses 

in, 35. 
Political Economy. See Political and 

Social Science. 
Preachers to the University. 19. 
Prizes, 57. 
Registration in College, 68. 

Law School, 73. 
Medical School, 79. 
School of Pharmacy, 

83 
summer School, 104. 
Religious Culture, 11. 
Romance Languages, Courses in. 29. 
Rooms, Assignment of, 63. 
■scholarship, Grades of, 51. 
Scholarships, 58. 
School of Pharmacy, 80. 

Admission, 83. 
Courses of In- 
struction. 80. 
Expenses. 83. 
Faculty, 80. 
Registration, 82. 
Shakespere Club, 118. 
Social Science. See Political and So- 
cial Science. 
Societies See Organizations. 
Spanish, Courses in, 30. 
Students not Candidates for a Degree, 
10. 

College. 83. 
Graduate. 10, 54, 83. 
Law School, 94. 
Medical School, 96. 
Optional, 67, 92. 
Summer School, 
105. 

Studies. See Greek, Latin, etc. 
Summary. 134. 
Summer School. 101. 

Admission, 104. 
Certificates. 104. 
Courses of Instruc- 
tion, 103. 
Educational Confer- 
ences, 103. 
Expenses, 104. 
Faculty, 101. 
Registration, 104. 
Students, 105. 
Trustees, 12. 
Tuition Fee. in College, 61. 

Law School. 73. 
Medical School, 78. 
School of Pharmacv. 

82. 
Summer School, 104. 
Tuition, Free, 60. 
University Library, 109. 

Organizations, See 
Organizations. 
Vacations, 6, 10. 
Women, Admission of, 10, 56. 
Worship. 11. 
Year, college. 10. 

Young Men's Christian Association, 
11. 120.